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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for June or search for June in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4: girlhood 1839-1843; aet. 20-23 (search)
eyes your happiness. The great riddle of life is no longer a riddle to you; the great mystery is solved. I need not say to you how very deeply and devoutly I rejoice with you; and no one more so, I assure you. Among all your friends, I am the oldest friend of your .76 fair young bride; she is a beautiful spirit, a truth, which friendship has learned by heart in a few years. Love has taught you in as many hours! Of course you seem to be transfigured and glorified. You walk above in the June air, while Sumner and I, like the poor (sprites) in Faust, who were struggling far down in the cracks and fissures of the rocks, cry out to you, O take us with you! Take us with you! In fine, my dear Doctor, God bless you and yours. You know already how much I approve your choice. I went to your office this afternoon to tell you with my own lips; but you were not there. Take, therefore, this brief expression of my happiness at knowing you are so happy; and believe me Ever sincerely
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
movement of the whole abdominal and lumbar region. We thought it indecent. The savages were much better, though they only stamp their bare feet and clap their hands in rhythm without music. One had a curious smooth lyre, which seemed to give no sound. Their teeth were beautifully white and regular. One of them came up to me and said, Mamma, as if to indicate my age. Then into a bark hut, to see the Soudanese baby dance — a dear little child that danced very funnily to a tumtur. Early June found her back in Boston and hard at work. June 8. Finished my screed for the July Forum. Subject, A Proper Observance of the Fourth of July. I have prayed over this piece of work as over all the others which have been strung, one after another, in this busiest of years for me. I have also despaired of it, and am not yet sure of its acceptance. Next day she felt that she must see the last of dear Edwin Booth. The Journal describes his funeral at length; the sun perfectly golden beh
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
hool, when the Jews greedily absorbed the philosophy of the Greeks. This was Mr. S. H. Butcher, the well-known Greek scholar. She enjoyed his visit greatly, and they talked high and disposedly of things classical and modern. May 28. My meeting of Women Ministers. They gathered very slowly and I feared that it would prove a failure, but soon we had a good number. Mary Graves helped me very much.... Afterwards I felt a malignant fatigue and depression, not caring to do anything. In June she received the first of her collegiate honors, the degree of Doctor of Laws, conferred by Tufts College. This gratified her deeply, and she describes the occasion at length, noting that she was favored with the Tufts yell twice. Lawrence Evans came, and Harry Hall. .. I read the part of my speech about which I had hesitated, about our trying to put an end to the Turkish horrors. It was the best of the speech. Seeking divine aid before I made my remarks, I suddenly said to myself, Chri
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 15: mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord 1908-1910; aet. 89-91 (search)
Glen there was but the one stout door. On this occasion, after lying helpless and despairing for some time, she managed to unlock the door and call the faithful maid.) On June 30 she writes:-- Oh, beautiful last day of Junel Perhaps my last June on earth.... I shall be thankful to live as long as I can be of comfort or help to any one ... July 12.... Sherman to Corse [Civil War], Can you hold out till I arrive? Corse to Sherman, I have lost an arm, my cheekbone, and am minus one ear, ense of the moment, which led a French friend to say of me: Mme. Howe possede le mot a un degree remarquable. I was often praised for saying just the right word, and I usually did this with a strong feeling that it ought to be said. Early in June, just as she was preparing for the summer flitting, she had a bad fall, breaking a rib. This delayed the move for a week, no more, the bone knitting easily. She was soon happy among her green trees, her birds singing around her. The memories o