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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11., The Second Battle of Bunker's Hill. (search)
nker's Hill, about nine o'clock, and immediately proceeded down the street on the westerly side of Bunker's Hill; a part of the men under the command of Capt. Kyes, at the same time were ordered to take post on the east side of the street, just under the hill, in order to intercept any persons who might escape from the houses in the street, some of which were occupied by the enemy. These houses, which were a little without the compact part of the town, the enemy suffered to remain unburnt in June last, for their own convenience.—They were now surrounded and set fire to by our men. In one of them they found six soldiers, and one woman, all of whom except one refractory fellow, who was killed were brought off. In another of the houses, according to the information of the prisoners, lived seventeen of the enemy's carpenters. As the woman says she went to this house, in order to borrow something, just before our men arrived; but seeing no light, and not being able to get into that part o
he Medford paper to which I have referred, a copy of an order of exercises which you probably all read. These exercises commenced at three o'clock. The graduating class had the usual salutatory in Latin followed by reading in French, German and Spanish, English essay and the valedictory, while the other pupils aided to the best of their ability. Then came award of prizes, given by some of the visiting committee, and the presentation of a gold medal to each graduate. If the reunion came in June, and the weather permitted, a collation was served under the trees in the garden, and a number of pupils showed their proficiency in horsemanship. In the early evening there was a concert given by the pupils, which was followed by social enjoyment and band playing. I have made mention of the possession of ears and eyes by the small fry. The following is what they heard and saw on one Saturday afternoon. It was the usual custom for the principal to go to Boston on that day, and some of the
o, having the Sick & infirm of Seven Regiments left there some of them ill with the Small Pox: & those Surgeons not having had the Small Pox themselves, General Abercromby order'd your Petitioner to remain there with that Command. & ordered the Surgeons up to Ticonderoga with the Army.—That he attended all the Sick there at said Encampment while the Army was gone to the Lake. & dressed near 300 of the wounded when they came down from the Lake; & continued in Said Service from the beginning of June to the last of November: in which Time he exhausted all his med'cine (excepting a small Quantity as appears by his accot) & bought more at Albany having Col. Bagley's Promise that he would endeavour the Province should pay him for them. & his Trouble also—That the Reason of his not petitioning yr Honrs before the last Session was the Absence of Col Bagley, whose Assistance he very much wanted for informing your Honours of the whole Affair. nothing doubting but that your Honours were ever rea