Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for June 1st or search for June 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 30 results in 17 document sections:

1 2
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
f light artillery, to reenforce General Joseph E. Johnston at Jackson, Mississippi. The fact is that, on the 10th of May, Mr. Seddon, the Secretary of War, had even directed that still another force of five thousand men should be withdrawn from my department to be sent to Vicksburg to the assistance of General Pemberton. But my protest against so exhaustive a drain upon my command was fortunately heeded, and I was allowed to retain the reduced force I then had under me, amounting on the 1st of June, for the whole State of South Carolina, to not more than ten thousand men. With these, it was evident, I could not protect every vulnerable point at the same time; and thereafter, whenever the occasion arose, I had to withdraw troops from one quarter of the department to reenforce another. The fact that a new commander of high engineering repute, General Gillmore, had been sent to supersede General Hunter General Hunter was transferred from the Department of Kansas to the command of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. (search)
ing movements began — this time toward Cold Harbor. Sheridan's cavalry had taken possession of Cold Harbor on the 31st, and had been promptly followed up by two corps of infantry. The Sixth and Eighteenth corps reached Cold Harbor on the 1st of June.--editors. Longstreet's and a part of Hill's corps, with Hoke's and Breckinridge's divisions, Breckinridge came from the Valley and joined Lee's army at the North Anna [Hanover Junction] with about 2700 men. Hoke had just arrived from Peter. Pickett's division, which had been serving in the Department of North Carolina, had also joined its corps at the North Anna.--E. M. L. were thrown across their front. The fighting began on the Cold Harbor line, late in the afternoon of the 1st of June, by a heavy attack upon the divisions of Hoke and Kershaw. Clingman's brigade on Hoke's left gave way, and Wofford's on Kershaw's right, being turned, was also forced back; but the further progress of the attack was checked and the line partl
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Grant on the Wilderness campaign. (search)
h line. On the 31st General Wilson's division of cavalry destroyed the railroad bridges over the South Anna River, after defeating the enemy's cavalry. General Sheridan, on the same day, reached Cold Harbor, and held it until relieved by the Sixth Corps and General Smith's command, The Wilderness Tavern. From a photograph taken in 1884. Brass Coehorns in use at Cold Harbor. From a War-time sketch. which had just arrived, via White House, from General Butler's army. On the first day of June an attack was made at 5 P. M. by the Sixth Corps and the troops under General Smith, the other corps being held in readiness to advance on the receipt of orders. This resulted in our carrying and holding the enemy's first line of works in front of the right of the Sixth Corps, and in front of General Smith. During the attack the enemy made repeated assaults on each of the corps not engaged in the main attack, but was repulsed with heavy loss in every instance. That night he made sev
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at the beginning of Grant's campaign against Richmond. (search)
The opposing forces at the beginning of Grant's campaign against Richmond. For much of the information contained in this list and in similar lists to follow, the editors are indebted (in advance of the publication of the Official records ) to Brigadier-General Richard C. Drum, Adjutant-General of the Army. During the movement to Cold Harbor some consolidations of brigades and divisions were made, organizations mustered out, and reenforcements received. For the composition of the army, June 1st, see pp. 184-87. The impossibility of obtaining complete data relative to the casualties among officers in this campaign makes it necessary to omit such information.--editors. The Union Army--Lieutenant-General, Ulysses S. Grant. Escort: B, F and K, 5th &. S. Cav., Capt. Julius W. Mason. Army of the Potomac, Maj.-Gen. George G. Meade. Provost Guard, Brig.-Gen. Marsena R. Patrick: C and D, 1st Mass. Cav., Capt. Edward A. Flint; 80th N. Y. Inf. (20th Militia), Col. Theodore B. Gates
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cold Harbor. June 1st, 1864. (search)
l. Alvin White; 142d N. Y., Col. N. Martin Curtis; 97th Pa., Col. Henry R. Guss. artillery Brigade, Capt. Samuel S. Elder: B, 1st U. S., Capt. S. S. Elder; L, 4th U. S., Lieut. Henry B. Beecher; A, 5th U. S., Lieut. James E. Wilson. On the 1st of June the Army of the Potomac, at and about Cold Harbor, numbered 103,875 present for duty, and General W. F. Smith brought from the Army of the James about 10,000, exclusive of 2500 left to guard the landing at White House. The losses of the Union army from June 1st to 12th were as follows: command.Killed.Wounded. Captured or Missing.Total. Engineers 3  3 Second Army Corps494 24425743,510 Fifth Army Corps149749 4421,340 Sixth Army Corps483 20641682,715 Ninth Army Corps219 11263561,701 Eighteenth Army Corps448 23652063,019 Cavalry Corps51328 70449 Aggregate18449077 181612,737 The Confederate Army, General Robert E. Lee. The organization of the Army of Northern Virginia at Cold Harbor was substantially the same as at the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cold Harbor. (search)
Frequent messengers from Sheridan came during the night, urging the importance of rapid movement. About 9 the next day (June 1st) the head of the column reached Sheridan's position, and the cavalry was withdrawn. The enemy, who had been seriously t advance of Wright's command holding the center was therefore perpendicular to that of the enemy. On the forenoon of June 1st Wright occupied an intrenched line close to Old Cold Harbor. At that time Hoke's division formed the Confederate right,eckinridge's division took position opposite, extending the Confederate line to the Chickahominy. Burnside, May 30th to June 1st, occupied lines facing south and west, above Sydnor's sawmill; June 2d he withdrew to Warren's right. Ewell's position till in death, with his head to the works, lay the colonel, the brave and genial Colonel Elisha S. Kellogg. Killed on June 1st, the day on which his regiment suffered great loss.--editors. When night came on, the groans and moaning of the woun
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Eighteenth Corps at Cold Harbor. (search)
Eighteenth Corps and to ask for further orders. At daylight on June 1st I received from the headquarters of General Grant an order to procll back under View of Union breastworks on the Cold Harbor line, June 1. from a sketch made at the time. cover, and held the line of the cA. M. of the 2d I received the following order: 10:05 P. M., June 1st. You will make your dispositions to attack to-morrow morning onal Burnham. I had had but about ten thousand men with me on the 1st of June, on my arrival, and had already lost heavily in killed and woundagainst the right flank of the enemy early on the morning of the 1st of June. From the failure there resulted a concentration that left four to the enemy, caused a delay of many hours in the attack of the 1st of June, made that attack fruitless in results, and gave to us the murdeor New Castle, fifteen miles up the Pamunkey, and thence, on the 1st of June, about twelve miles to Cold Harbor, taking place on the right of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Trevilian raid. (search)
Sheridan's Trevilian raid. by Theo. F. Rodenbough, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. A. See Sheridan's Richmond raid, p. 188, of which this article is a continuation, for a map giving Sheridan's route in the Trevilian raid.--editors. While Torbert and Gregg had been engaged near Cold Harbor, Wilson had been operating on our right flank. He fought at Mechump's Creek on May 31st, 1864; Ashland, June 1st; and Hawes's Shop and Totopotomoy Creek, June 2d. The fight at Ashland was brought on by McIntosh, in a successful dash at the railroad bridges over the South Anna. The permanent injury of Lee's lines of supply was an important element in Grant's purposes. To this end, on the 26th of May, Hunter was directed to move down the Shenandoah Valley to Lynchburg, cut the canal, and return over the Lynchburg branch of the Virginia Central to Charlottesville, where it was expected he would meet Sheridan. That officer was again to cut loose from the army, and, after tearing up the Vir
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Lee in the Wilderness campaign. (search)
ack which prevented the junction of Hancock's and Warren's columns after they had crossed the North Anna. On May 26th Grant withdrew his army from its rather critical position on the south side of the North Anna, and moved again to the east, down the Pamunkey, which he crossed on the 28th, to find Lee confronting him on the Totopotomoy. Grant had received reenforcements from Washington, and had drawn Smith's corps from Butler in Bermuda Hundred. This corps reached him at Cold Harbor on June 1st. On the 30th the Confederate forces were in line of battle, with the left at Atlee's Station confronting the Federal army. General Lee was still sick, and occupied a house at night for the first time during the campaign. As one of his trusted lieutenants has well said: In fact, nothing but his own determined will kept him in the field; and it was then rendered more evident than ever that he was the head and front, the very life and soul of his army. Grant declined general battle and dre
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
rigade (joined army in the field June 28th), Col. Horace Capron: 14th Ill., Lieut.-Col. David P. Jenkins; 8th Mich., Lieut.-Col. Elisha Mix, Maj. William L. Buck, Maj. Edward Coates; McLaughlin's Ohio Squadron, Maj. Richard Rice. Independent Brigade, Col. Alex. W. Holeman, Lieut.-Col. Silas Adams: 1st Ky., Lieut.-Col. Silas Adams; 11th Ky., Lieut.-Col. Archibald J. Alexander. effective strength of the Union Army. date.Infantry.Artillery. Cavalry.Total. May 1st88,1884460 6,14998,797 June 1st (17th Corps joined June 8th 94,310560112,908 112,819 July 1st88,0865945 12,039106,070 August 1st75,6595499 10,51791,675 September 1st67,67446909,394 81,758 Losses: killed, 4423; wounded, 22,822; captured or missing, 4442 = 31,687. (Major E. C. Dawes, of Cincinnati, who has made a special study of the subject, estimates the Union loss at about 40,000, and the Confederate loss at about the same.) The Confederate Army. Army of Tennessee, General Joseph E. Johnston, General John
1 2