Browsing named entities in John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies. You can also browse the collection for June 1st or search for June 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

ollowing extract from Major General G. W. Smith's official report attests the presence of over three thousand (3000) Georgia State troops, which could have been, in May, 1864, assembled at Dalton, in the event the Commanding General of our Army had desired to offer battle, when in possession of Rocky-faced Ridge: headquarters, Georgia militia, Macon, Ga., September 15th, 1864. General J. B. Hood, Commanding Army of Tennessee, near Lovejoy Station: General:--My appointment was dated 1st June. I took command a few days thereafter, relieving General Wayne, who returned to the duties of his office as Adjutant and Inspector General of the State. The force then in the field was composed entirely of State officers, civil and military. They had been formed into two brigades of three regiments each, and one battalion of artillery, making in all a little over three thousand (3000). The command had reported for duty to General J. E. Johnston, and had been ordered to guard the crossing
ed when received. Respectfully, (Signed,) A. P. S. Official report of Major General G. W. Smith, Commanding Georgia militia, at and near Atlanta. headquarters Georgia militia, Macon, Georgia, September 15th, 1864. General J. B. Hood, Commanding Army of Tennessee, near Lovejoy Station. General:--I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Georgia militia, under my command, during the operations at or near Atlanta. My appointment was dated the 1st of June. I took command a few days thereafter, relieving General Wagner, who returned to the duties of his office as adjutant and inspector general of the State. The force then in the field was composed entirely of State officers — civil and military. They had been formed into two brigades, of three regiments each, and one battalion of artillery, making in all a little over three thousand (3000) men. The officers of the militia not needed for these regiments took their places in the ranks as p