Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for June 1st or search for June 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
—a generation of brave spirits, steadfast and reflective, but beyond comparison ardent and generous. Lieutenant Johnston was subsequently assigned to duty at Jefferson Barracks, a short distance above St. Louis, on the Mississippi river, having been commissioned by John Quincy Adams, then President, as Second Lieutenant of the Sixth regiment of infantry, then regarded as the crack regiment of the army, under the command of Brigadier General Henry Atkinson. He reported for duty on the first of June. Lieutenant Johnston's first military service was performed in the expedition sent from Prairie-du-Chien, on the 29th of August, to compel the Winnebagoes to make reparation for outrages committed on the whites. He came for the first time in conflict with the red man of the forest, and saw the best specimen in the large and well-built Winnebagoes, then comparatively savage, but now the most peaceable and thriving of the semi-civilized tribes. Red Bird, Le Soleil, and the son and s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
—a generation of brave spirits, steadfast and reflective, but beyond comparison ardent and generous. Lieutenant Johnston was subsequently assigned to duty at Jefferson Barracks, a short distance above St. Louis, on the Mississippi river, having been commissioned by John Quincy Adams, then President, as Second Lieutenant of the Sixth regiment of infantry, then regarded as the crack regiment of the army, under the command of Brigadier General Henry Atkinson. He reported for duty on the first of June. Lieutenant Johnston's first military service was performed in the expedition sent from Prairie-du-Chien, on the 29th of August, to compel the Winnebagoes to make reparation for outrages committed on the whites. He came for the first time in conflict with the red man of the forest, and saw the best specimen in the large and well-built Winnebagoes, then comparatively savage, but now the most peaceable and thriving of the semi-civilized tribes. Red Bird, Le Soleil, and the son and s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
rth and stormed and taken the outer entrenchments and camps of McClellan's army at Seven Pines, capturing ten pieces of artillery, six thousand muskets, and other spoils of war, and destroying the prestige of the second On to Richmond movement. But ere the day was done victory had been checked, and glory had exacted costly tribute, for Johnston himself had fallen, terribly wounded. The hero, covered with ten wounds received in Florida and Mexico, had been prostrated by another; and when June 1st dawned on the confronting armies, the Army of Northern Virginia was without the leader who held its thorough confidence, but now lay stricken well-nigh unto death. The casualty which thus deprived the army of its honored commander, and closed to him the opportunity which, in large measure, his own great skill had created, opened the opportunity of Lee. Fortunate the State, and great the people from whom sprung two such sons—fortunate the army that always had a leader worthy of it—happy he