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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for June 3rd or search for June 3rd in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
eipt of orders. This resulted in our carrying and holding the enemy's first line of works in front of the right of the Sixth Corps and in front of General Smith. During the attack the enemy made repeated assaults on each of the corps not engaged in the main attack, but were repulsed with heavy loss in every instance. That night he made several assaults to regain what he had lost in the day, but failed. The 2d was spent in getting troops into position for an attack on the 3d. On the 3d of June we again assaulted the enemy's works in the hope of driving him from his position. In this attempt our loss was heavy, while that of the enemy, I have reason to believe, was comparatively light. It was the only general attack made from the Rapidan to the James which did not inflict upon the enemy losses to compensate for our own losses. I would not be understood as saying that all previous attacks resulted in victories to our arms, or accomplished as much as I had hoped from them, but
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
ourth Army Corps, of operations July 27-September 8. No. 13Surg. J. Theodore Heard, U. S. Army, Medical Director. No. 14Maj. Gen. David S. Stanley, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations May 3-July 26. No. 15Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations August 4-September 8. No. 16Col. Isaac M. Kirby, One hundred and first Ohio Infantry, commanding First Brigade. No. 17Capt. William H. Jamison, Twenty-first Illinois Infantry, of operations June 3-September 8. No. 18Lieut. Col. William T. Chapman, Thirty-eighth Illinois Infantry, of operations May 28-September 8. No. 19Brig. Gen. Walter C. Whitaker, U. S. Army, commanding Second Brigade, of operations May 3-June 30. No. 20Col. Jacob E. Taylor, Fortieth Ohio Infantry, commanding Second Brigade, of operations June 30-September 8. No. 21Maj. George Hicks, Ninety-sixth Illinois Infantry, of operations June 21-September 8. No. 22Lieut. Col. Augustus G. Tassin, Thirty-fifth Indiana In
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
in front of Allatoona Pass. General McPherson was ordered to draw off from Dallas and move up six miles and replace General Hooker on our right flank in front of New Hope Church, General Thomas and General Schofield to move to the left, making as much eastward as possible. General McPherson got up about noon of June 1 and the general movement began, but heavy rains set in, delaying us so that General Schofield did not actually envelop the enemy's extreme right until late in the afternoon of June 3; but in the mean time, coincident with the first move that could indicate to the enemy our purpose, I sent direct to Allatoona Pass all my available cavalry, General Stoneman to secure the east end and General Garrard the west end-both of whom succeeded. During the 4th it rained very hard and the night was dark and stormy, but in the morning the enemy was gone and we had full possession of Allatoona Pass and the railroad as far down as Kenesaw Mountain, which is a detached mountain near-Ma
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
trong demonstration by artillery and musketry firing was made by Stanley and Newton. May 30 and 31, skirmishing and some slight reconnaissances by ourselves and the enemy, but no material change occurred. June 1, the movement of the army to the left commenced, General McPherson and General Davis having withdrawn from the extreme right position. On the 2d the movement was continued; the Twentieth and Twenty-third Corps and part of the Fourteenth passed beyond our extreme left. June 3 and 4, nothing of consequence, excepting that I thinned and extended my lines so as to cover the ground occupied by the Twenty-third Corps, and afterward by Davis' division, of the Fourteenth Corps, relieving those troops in order to prolong our lines to the left. The result of these movements was to cause the enemy to abandon his lines on the night of June 4. June 5, the command rested. June 6, marched toward Acworth, crossing Allatoona Creek, and massed the command near Dr. Peters
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
of Geary's division. We also put in a battery to play upon the enemy's lines. Early on the 27th moved the division to the left to relieve Wood's division, which moved off to the left to attempt to turn the enemy's right. The position of the division here remained substantially the same until the night of the 4th of June, during which the enemy evacuated his line. Cruft's brigade was started back to Kingston as escort to the wagon train of the corps on the 30th. On the night of the 3d of June we relieved half of Davis' front on the left of this division. Our time was constantly employed, whilst in this position, in pushing out works, by successive advances, close to the enemy; and a constant fire of musketry and artillery was kept up whenever we could annoy the enemy. The 5th we lay in camp near New Hope Church. On the 6th the division moved on the Acworth road to the vicinity of Morris Hill Chapel. The division remained in position at Morris Hill until the morning of the 1
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 21 (search)
No. 17. report of Capt. William H. Jamison, Twenty-first Illinois Infantry, of operations June 3-September 8. Hdqrs. Twenty-First Illinois Volunteers, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 11, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to report that the Twenty-first Illinois, numbering about 200 men, under command of Maj. James E. Calloway, joined the First Brigade, First Division, Fourth Army Corps, at Kingston, Ga., on the 3d day of June, 1864. On the 4th we marched from Kingston at 4 p. m., as guard to supply train. That evening we marched eight miles and halted at ] 1 p. m. at the village of Etowah, on the bank of the Euharlee Creek. On the 5th we moved but slowly, on account of bad roads, and halted at Raccoon Creek. On the morning of the 6th we moved at 6 a. m., crossed the creek and began the ascent of Allatoona Mountain, camping near Burnt Hickory at 11 p. m., having marched since dark by torchlight. On the 7th we marched at sunrise, crossing Pumpkin Vine Creek at 9 a. m. On the 8
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
nt line during the night. May 28, still on the front line. . May 29, hold the same position during the day and night, as yesterday; I man wounded. May 30, still occupy the same works; nothing but the usual skirmish firing; 1 man wounded. May 31, still in the same works; very heavy skirmishing, but no general engagement. June 1, moved before daylight this morning one mile to the left, and relieved a part of General Whitaker's brigade. June 2, held the same position during day and night. June 3, still in same works. June 4, moved onehalf mile to the left, and relieved one of General Whitaker's regiments on the front line. June 5, the enemy evacuated our front early this morning, our skirmishers occupying their works; we moved over the works and encamped for the night. June 6, marched at 6 a. m. in direction of the railroad, and encamped about three miles from Acworth. June 7, cleaned up camp and arranged tents in proper order. June 8, still in camp; nothing of importance trans
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
tinued all day; casualties, 4 enlisted men wounded. On Monday, May 30, the skirmishing still continued; casualties, 2 enlisted men wounded. On Tuesday, May 31, our skirmishers were still engaged, and the casualties of this regiment, 1 enlisted man wounded. On Wednesday, June 1, the position of the regiment was still unchanged. The loss on this day was 1 enlisted man killed. On Thursday, June 2, no change of position took place; casualties of the regiment, 1 enlisted man wounded. On Friday, June 3, in the same position as on the 2d; casualties of the regiment, 2 enlisted men wounded. On Saturday, June 4, moved camp at daylight to the left, the rebels having retreated during the night. On Sunday, June 5, the regiment lay quietly in camp all day. On Monday, June 6, the regiment marched at 5 a. m. a distance of about six miles to near Acworth Station. The regiment lay in camp during the 7th, 8th, and 9th. On Friday, June 10, the regiment left camp at 7 a. m., and marched four mil
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
my's line. In half an hour the firing ceased and the night passed quietly. May 30, regiment relieved from picket at 8 p. m. and moved back to second line of works, where we lay for the night. There was constant skirmishing all day, our loss being 2 enlisted men killed. May 31, at sundown moved out to front line of works, where we lay all night. June 1, lay in front line all day; at dark were relieved and moved to rear, where lay for the night. June 2, lay still all day; 1 man wounded. June 3, at dark moved out to front line of works. June 4, entire division was relieved at dark and regiment moved one mile to rear and lay for the night. June 5, rebels evacuated their works during the past night. Regiment changed front and built works. June 6, at 5 a. m. moved two miles to rear to escort hospital trains Rejoined brigade at 7 a. m. Marched at 8 a. m. At 2 p. m. brigade halted and regiment went on picket. June 7, skirmished with rebel cavalry, capturing 8 prisoners. No loss in
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 51 (search)
e Oostenaula River, and again placed upon the skirmish lihe, which resulted in a loss of 2 enlisted men killed and 1 wounded. We occupied Calhoun that night, from which time to the 26th nothing of note occurred, at which time we arrived in front of New Hope Church, where the enemy had posted himself in a very strong position, and for the following ten or twelve days our duty was constant and dangerous, being under fire all of the time, and having one or two men wounded every day. On the 3d day of June Lieutenant-Colonel Swain was wounded, and the command of the — regiment then devolved upon Capt. J. W. Richards. On the 10th the veterans of the Twenty-second Illinois Volunteers, fifty-three in number, were assigned to the Forty-second Illinois. On the 15th the Fifty-first Illinois and the Forty-second were ordered forward as skirmishers to find the enemy's works, which we did in handsome style, driving them into their works and holding them there. Our loss was slight, being only 1 k
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