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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for June 3rd or search for June 3rd in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Warren Blues—Extra Billy's men: Roll of officers and men of a famous band of Veterans. (search)
at Manassas, December, 1861. Fristoe, Thomas M., private, killed at Seven Pines. Foster, John R., private, wounded (dead). Foaley, Noah, private, missing (dead). Grove, William, private, killed at first battle of Manassas. Garrett, Newman, private, wounded (living). Gore, Dewitt C., private, wounded (living). Green, Bushrod R., private, deserted to the enemy. Gordon, Oliver R., private, killed at Seven Pines. Garmong, Theophilus H., private, killed at Cold Harbor, June 3rd. Hoskins, Daniel H., private, killed at the Wilderness. Hough, Alpheus, private, wounded (dead). Hall, John, corporal, died at Manassas, 1861. Hall, George W., private, killed at Fisher's Hill. Henry, John J., private, wounded. Henry, Marcus, private, wounded at the Wilderness (dead). Henry, John W., private, wounded at Winchester, 1864. Henry, Gibson E., private, killed at first battle of Fredericksburg. Henry, Moses, private, wounded (dead). Henry, George W.,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The first Confederate Memorial day. From the Times-dispatch, July 15, 1906. (search)
spatch, July 15, 1906. How many of our States claim the first memorial organization? What matters if there are no records to prove it? New Orleans claims it; Georgia claims it; Portsmouth, Va.; Richmond, Va., claim it. But the little village of Warrenton, Va., claims, and can prove it, the first Confederate Memorial Day. Killed in skirmish at Fairfax Courthouse, June 1, 1861, Captain John Quincy Marr, Warrenton Rifles, 17th Virginia Regiment, buried in the little village graveyard, June 3rd, with military honors; wept over by the old and young; flowers strewn on his grave, and the first Confederate Memorial Day was observed. After the first battle of Manassas, July 21, 1861, the dead and mortally wounded, numbering many, were brought to this same little village, and again memorial day was observed by the women and children. Was this, the women's work, discontinued? No, organized; no, but the spontaneous outburst of the Rachels throughout the land weeping for her children a