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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
n his army a few days' rest at this point, again put it in motion on the 23d for Dallas, with a view of turning the difficult pass at Allatoona. On the afternoon of the 25th the advance, under General Hooker, had a severe battle with the enemy, driving him back to New Hope Church, near Dallas. Several sharp encounters occurred at this point. The most important was on the 28th, when the enemy assaulted General Mc- Pherson at Dallas, but received a terrible and bloody repulse. On the 4th of June Johnston abandoned his intrenched position at New Hope Church and retreated to the strong positions of Kenesaw, Pine, and Lost Mountains. He was forced to yield the two last-named places and concentrate his army on Kenesaw, where, on the 27th, Generals Thomas and McPherson made a determined but unsuccessful assault. On the night of the 2d of July Sherman commenced moving his army by the right flank, and on the morning of the 3d found that the enemy, in consequence of this movement, had
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
ns August 24-September 8. No. 127Capt. George C. Lusk, Tenth Illinois Infantry, of operations May 1-August 20. No. 128Lieut. Col. James B. Cahill, Sixteenth Illinois Infantry. No. 129Col. William B. Anderson, Sixtieth Illinois Infantry. No. 130Col. Charles M. Lurm, Tenth Michigan Infantry, of operations May 16-August 27. No. 131Capt. William H. Dunphy, Tenth Michigan Infantry, of operations August 27-September 8. No. 132Col. Henry R. Mizner, Fourteenth Michigan Infantry, of operations June 4-September 5. No. 133Maj. Joel O. Martin, Seventeenth New York Infantry, of operations September 1. No. 134Col. John G. Mitchell, One hundred and thirteenth Ohio Infantry, commanding Second Brigade. No. 135Lieut. Col. Oscar Van Tassell, Thirty-fourth Illinois Infantry. No. 136Lieut. Col. Maris R. Vernon, Seventy-eighth Illinois Infantry. No. 137Lieut. Col. John S. Pearce, Ninety-eighth Ohio Infantry. No. 138Capt. Toland Jones, One hundred and thirteenth Ohio Infantry. No. 139Col. Henry
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
ed the roads leading back to Aliatoona and Acworth, after which I pushed General Stoneman's cavalry rapidly into Allatoona, at the east end of the pass, and General Garrard's cavalry around by the rear to the west end of the pass. Both of these commands reached the points designated without trouble, and we thereby accomplished our real purpose of turning the Allatoona Pass. Ordering the railroad bridge across the Etowah to be at once rebuilt, I continued working by the left, and off the 4th of June had resolved to leave Jobnston in his intrenched position at Newv Hope Church, and move to the railroad about Acworth, when he abandoned his intrenchments, after which we moved readily to Acworth, and reached the railroad on the 6th of June. I at once examined in person the Allatoona Pass, and found it admirably adapted to our use as a secondary base, and gave the necessary orders for its defense and garrison, and as soon as the railroad bridge was finished across the Etowah, our stores
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
ommenced, General McPherson and General Davis having withdrawn from the extreme right position. On the 2d the movement was continued; the Twentieth and Twenty-third Corps and part of the Fourteenth passed beyond our extreme left. June 3 and 4, nothing of consequence, excepting that I thinned and extended my lines so as to cover the ground occupied by the Twenty-third Corps, and afterward by Davis' division, of the Fourteenth Corps, relieving those troops in order to prolong our lines to the left. The result of these movements was to cause the enemy to abandon his lines on the night of June 4. June 5, the command rested. June 6, marched toward Acworth, crossing Allatoona Creek, and massed the command near Dr. Peters' house, on the Acworth and Sandtown road, about two miles from Acworth, which was already in possession of our troops. June 7, 8, and 9, all that was done by the entire army was establishing the depots at Allatoona, rebuilding the bridge across the Etow
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
ker had found the enemy in force. We crossed the Pumpkin Vine near sunset, and at night closed up to Hooker's left. On the 26th Colonel Grose's brigade went into line on the left of Geary's division. We also put in a battery to play upon the enemy's lines. Early on the 27th moved the division to the left to relieve Wood's division, which moved off to the left to attempt to turn the enemy's right. The position of the division here remained substantially the same until the night of the 4th of June, during which the enemy evacuated his line. Cruft's brigade was started back to Kingston as escort to the wagon train of the corps on the 30th. On the night of the 3d of June we relieved half of Davis' front on the left of this division. Our time was constantly employed, whilst in this position, in pushing out works, by successive advances, close to the enemy; and a constant fire of musketry and artillery was kept up whenever we could annoy the enemy. The 5th we lay in camp near Ne
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
na. Hbavy skirmishing ensued, driving the enemy about one and a half miles. Formed a line of battle and moved forward, the enemy withdrawing; camped near Cassville. May 23, 3 p. m., marched with the division via Burnt Hickory, across Pumpkin Vine Creek, to a position near Dallas. Lay in reserve at Dallas till the morning of May 30, when the brigade was ordered to accompany a supply train to Kingston. The Twenty-first Illinois returned from veteran furlough, joined the brigade at Kingston June 4. Rejoined the division near Acworth June 7. June 9, Thirty-eighth Illinois joined the brigade, having returned from veteran furlough. On the morning of June 10 General Cruft was ordered to Chattanooga on account of severe sickness, and I had the honor to assume command. Moved out on the Burnt Hickory and Marietta road in advance of the division, deployed the Twenty-first Illinois and Thirty-first Indiana as skirmishers; the line soon became engaged with the enemy's skirmishers; drove them
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
entieth Corps, pressed close upon the enemy's lines, and fortified four miles north of Dallas. May 27, changed position to left, relieving General Wood's division. Close skirmishing all day. May 28, advanced, drove in the enemy's outposts, and fortified. May 29, advanced the battery to front line; heavy skirmishing; during the night the enemy attacked and was repulsed with heavy loss. We continued the varied scenes, some changes in position, with heavy skirmishing, until the night of June 4, when the enemy withdrew from our front, June 6, marched with the corps east ten miles to within two and a half miles of Acworth, on the railroad, where we remained with comparative quietness until June 10, when we moved three miles southeast and found the enemy in strong position on Pine Mountain in my front. Skirmishing commenced and continued until the night of June 13, when the enemy retreated and my brigade advanced upon the mountain early on the morning of June 14. On this mount
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 30 (search)
we hear heavy firing. Form line of battle, the Seventy-fifth in second line, and take no active part till the 27th May, the regiment has a sharp skirmish; 1 man is wounded. Soon after daylight we are relieved to take a new position at the left. Strengthen the works and lay behind them till June 1, when we move one-fourth mile to the left. While getting into position have 1 man wounded. Here again we strengthen works and remain in them, doing only picket duty. One man killed on the 4th of June. On the morning of the 5th the enemy had again evacuated and we follow toward Acworth and go into camp near the town and remain till the morning of June 10. Vv e march in a drenching rain about four miles, come upon the enemy, form line, and build temporary works. At daylight the regiment moves to the front; have I man wounded. Again, on June 15, we find no enemy in our front. In the afternoon, having come upon the enemy, the Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteers move in second line, joi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
28, still on the front line. . May 29, hold the same position during the day and night, as yesterday; I man wounded. May 30, still occupy the same works; nothing but the usual skirmish firing; 1 man wounded. May 31, still in the same works; very heavy skirmishing, but no general engagement. June 1, moved before daylight this morning one mile to the left, and relieved a part of General Whitaker's brigade. June 2, held the same position during day and night. June 3, still in same works. June 4, moved onehalf mile to the left, and relieved one of General Whitaker's regiments on the front line. June 5, the enemy evacuated our front early this morning, our skirmishers occupying their works; we moved over the works and encamped for the night. June 6, marched at 6 a. m. in direction of the railroad, and encamped about three miles from Acworth. June 7, cleaned up camp and arranged tents in proper order. June 8, still in camp; nothing of importance transpired. June 9, remained quiet
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
ualties, 2 enlisted men wounded. On Tuesday, May 31, our skirmishers were still engaged, and the casualties of this regiment, 1 enlisted man wounded. On Wednesday, June 1, the position of the regiment was still unchanged. The loss on this day was 1 enlisted man killed. On Thursday, June 2, no change of position took place; casualties of the regiment, 1 enlisted man wounded. On Friday, June 3, in the same position as on the 2d; casualties of the regiment, 2 enlisted men wounded. On Saturday, June 4, moved camp at daylight to the left, the rebels having retreated during the night. On Sunday, June 5, the regiment lay quietly in camp all day. On Monday, June 6, the regiment marched at 5 a. m. a distance of about six miles to near Acworth Station. The regiment lay in camp during the 7th, 8th, and 9th. On Friday, June 10, the regiment left camp at 7 a. m., and marched four miles and encamped near Pine Knob, or Pine Top, near the enemy, our regiment on the second line, and was not en
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