Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for June 4th or search for June 4th in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
of said proportion, in accordance with section 9, chapter 218, of the Acts of the Legislature of 1863. 1864. At the town-meeting held April 4th, five thousand seven hundred and fifty dollars were appropriated to pay bounties to volunteers who have enlisted, or may enlist, to fill the quota of the town,—said bounty to be paid when the volunteer is mustered in and credited; and to reimburse those who have paid money on subscription for the above purpose. Another meeting was held on the 4th of June, at which the town voted to instruct the selectmen to enlist thirty men, in anticipation of a future call of the President of the United States for more men for the military service; and the town-treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay the same. On the 5th of December, Grove Gaylord and Warren Walker were chosen a committee to procure men enough for the military service to clear the town from draft, in anticipation of a future call from the President. The treasurer was authorize
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
s of soldiers. 1864. April 29th, Four thousand two hundred and fifty dollars were raised to procure a portion of the quota of the town from the Commonwealth. June 4th, The selectmen were directed to enlist twenty men as soon as possible, to answer for any future call of the President up to March, 1865. 1865. March 6th, Votefty dollars to fill the quota of the town. May 24th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to men who were drafted and accepted in 1863. June 4th, Voted, to raise three thousand dollars to pay bounties of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each of twenty-four volunteers to fill the quota of the town. d twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, and be credited to the town previous to March, 1865. A similar vote was passed on the 4th of June. Whately, according to a return made by the selectmen in 1866, furnished seventy-three men for the war, which cannot have been correct. The true number was
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
eting voted to act as a committee of the whole in aid of the same objects. 1864. April 25th, The town voted to raise by a tax four thousand two hundred and fifty dollars to pay bounties to thirty-four men enlisting to the credit of the town. June 4th, Voted, to authorize the treasurer to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars up to March 1, 1865, to each recruit who shall be mustered into the service of the United States and credited to the quota of the town. Longmeadow furni William Melcher, J. O. Moseley, Reuben Champion, Aaron Bagg, Julius Day, Edward Parsons, and Henry Dickinson were chosen a Finance Committee, who were authorized to aid the families of the soldiers, and to furnish each soldier with a revolver. June 4th, The vote to furnish revolvers was reconsidered. July 19th, The finance committee were instructed to pay each volunteer from that town a bounty of one hundred dollars, and it was voted that such volunteer be exempt from taxation for war purpose
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
e President, April 15, for seventy-five thousand men, twenty-one men of Reading enlisted, and on the 19th started for Washington. They were in the first battle of Bull Run. April 30th, Provision was made for aid to the families of volunteers. June 4th, Five thousand dollars were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families as provided by law; also voted to pay each inhabitant who enlists for the war twenty-five dollars for an outfit. 1862. March 3d, Three thousand dollars were appropri at one hundred dollars. 1863. December 7th, The selectmen were authorized to use all legal and proper means to fill the town's quota, in compliance with the call of the President, dated Oct. 17, 1863, for three hundred thousand men. 1864. June 4th, Voted, to raise a sufficient amount of money to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist and be credited to the quota of Sudbury, in anticipation of any subsequent call of the President for more men
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
were authorized to pay the same amount of State aid to the families of drafted men that is paid to the families of volunteers. 1864. March 7th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow a sum not exceeding six thousand dollars to be expended under the direction of the selectmen in furnishing aid to the dependants of volunteers. April 4th, Voted, to raise by taxation two thousand two hundred and fifty dollars to refund money contributed by individuals to aid recruiting and paying bounties. June 4th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay bounties to volunteers who shall enlist under any call of the President from March 1, 1864, to March 1, 1865, provided the amount shall not exceed the sum of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer. Voted, to authorize the selectmen to pay to those volunteers who enlisted in May, 1861, whatever may be legally due them by reason of the vote passed May 4th of the same year. June 18th, Voted, to appropriate two hundred dollar
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Suffolk County. (search)
street for military uses. The offer was accepted and the thanks of the city government voted to Mr. Evans. A special committee was appointed to have charge of the building. May 27th, A letter from Ex-Governor Everett was read, asking that books in the Public Library, of which there are duplicate copies, be sent to the front for the use of our soldiers; an order was passed to have it done. Several votes were passed during the month of May to provide armories for new military companies. June 4th, A committee was appointed to have charge of the payment of State aid to soldiers' families, as provided by law, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow ten thousand dollars to pay the same. July 22d, A committee was appointed to make arrangements for the comfort and accommodation of the three-months companies and regiments on their arrival in Boston at the expiration of their terms of service. December 16th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty-five thousand dollars for the p
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
h of August this bounty was increased fifty dollars. September 29th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service. 1863. March 3d, Three thousand dollars were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. August 24th, A bounty of one hundred dollars was authorized to be paid to drafted men, and State aid to their families. September 19th, One thousand dollars were appropriated for the benefit of the families of deceased soldiers. 1864. June 4th, A sufficient amount of money was appropriated to fill the present and all future quotas of the town, the bounty to each volunteer not to exceed one hundred and fifty dollars. 1865. January 4th, The bounty to each volunteer, enlisting to fill the quota of the town, was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so remained until the end of the war. March 6th, Four thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families. Ashburnham furnished two hun