hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 524 524 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 46 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 10 10 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 9 9 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 9 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 7 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for June 5th or search for June 5th in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 6 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 31: the prison—discipline debates in Tremont Temple.—1846-1847. (search)
mi-Weekly Courier, June 24. by Henry H. Fuller, a hard-headed lawyer, who spoke twice, commending the resolutions in terse and pertinent remarks; and by Hillard, who appeared only once in the debate, urging fairness in the reports of the Society, and rebuking an anonymous newspaper attack on Sumner. Sumner, Howe, and Hillard were the subjects of coarse attacks in communications printed in the Boston Post, June 2, 4, 9, and 22. The first article was replied to by a writer in that journal, June 5. The Boston Advertiser, June 26 and 30, contained communications friendly to Dwight. On the other side there were several speakers,—Rev. George Allen, of Worcester, who consumed one hour in his first speech and two in another, comparing to some extent the two systems, but chiefly defending with friendly zeal Mr. Dwight; Bradford Sumner, a lawyer respectable in character, but moderate in professional attainments; J. Thomas Stevenson, who confessed that he knew nothing about prison discipline
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 33: the national election of 1848.—the Free Soil Party.— 1848-1849. (search)
which they should meet it. On May 27 there was a conference in Boston at the office of C. F. Adams, where were present Adams, S. C. Phillips, Sumner, Wilson, E. R. Hoar, E. L. Keyes, F. W. Bird, and Edward Walcutt. They decided in case General Taylor, or any candidate not distinctly committed against the extension of slavery, should be nominated at Philadelphia to enter at once upon an organized opposition to his election, and to call a State convention for the purpose. At a later meeting, June 5, they approved a form of call prepared by E. R. Hoar, and agreed to issue it in the event of General Taylor's nomination. Wilson and Allen were joined at Philadelphia by thirteen The last survivors of the fifteen were Stanley Matthews and John C. Vaughan, both of Ohio. The former died in 1889, and the latter died in Cincinnati in 1892. other delegates, who approved their public protest against General Taylor's nomination, and it was decided to call a national convention to be held at Bu
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 37: the national election of 1852.—the Massachusetts constitutional convention.—final defeat of the coalition.— 1852-1853. (search)
had always disapproved. Midway between the Democratic and Whig conventions he wrote to Sumner, June 11: My opinion is that we can make no effective stand on an independent candidate. If Governor Seward can succeed in preventing any resolution at the convention, my inclination is to declare in Scott's favor individually, but not collectively as Free Soilers. With him agreed S. C. Phillips and many others of the party. At a conference of the Free Soil leaders at the Adams House in Boston, June 5, there was developed such a want of common purpose that the party seemed near its end. In the midst of this perplexity, Sumner, while conferring with Chase and Seward, and keeping up a correspondence with Free Soilers at home, adhered steadily to his independent position, and counselled Wilson and other political friends to keep themselves entirely uncommitted until the field was made clear by the action of the two conventions. An account of a conference at Dr. Bailey's office in Washi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
a state of partial stupor while on the way. As soon as he reached his rooms he told Wilson that he should renew the conflict with slavery in the Senate as soon as he could return there. Wilson's speech at Worcester, June 4. Boston Telegraph, June 5. See Seward's Life, vol. II. p. 272. There was one man, at least, in Congress of mind unconquered and unconquerable. The next day was the first he had ever been absent from his seat since he became a senator. The assault produced a prodigioa panegyric to Brooks as the representative of Southern chivalry, and voted him a gold-headed cane. Similar testimonials were sent to him from other parts of the South. By June 4 he had received a dozen live-oak canes. New York Evening Post, June 5. Goblets and canes were presented to him at Ninety-six, oct. 3, 1856. Mason, the senator, and Jefferson Davis, member of the Cabinet, wrote letters commending his character and deed. At the end of the session, receptions and various tokens of h
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
stle, and enjoyed the Pyrenees capped with snow. June 4. Started at eight o'clock in the morning on the outside of the diligence for Eaux-Bonnes in the Pyrenees; as an accidental companion was a priest, with whom I talked a great deal, and who was very civil. The road was constantly ascending by the side of a beautiful little stream. Arrived before four o'clock; tasted the waters, took a bath, and made a contract with a guide to conduct me to-morrow across the mountains to Cauterets. June 5. Mounted on horseback at six o'clock in the morning; guide also on horseback, and another horse with my trunk led by a person on foot; traversed the mountain to Argeles, where I arrived about five o'clock; on the top was snow. Gave up going to Cauterets, to rest at the pleasant inn of Argeles; weary, very weary; on the way passed shepherds on the mountain. June 6. Left Argeles (after a night sleepless from fatigue) in a private carriage for Bagneres de Bigorre; then took another carriage
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
e, June 11, by James Parker; New York Independent, June 14, by D. W. Bartlett; New York Tribune, June 5; New York Evening Post, June 5 and 7; Chautauqua (N. Y.) Democrat, June 13; Iowa City RepublicanJune 5 and 7; Chautauqua (N. Y.) Democrat, June 13; Iowa City Republican, June 20. W. M. Dickson, of the Cincinnati bar, gave a vivid description of the scene, several years later, in a letter to the writer, and afterwards published it in the Cincinnati Commercial, Nov. 2ost. June 11; New York Herald, June 11; New York Tribune, June 11. The Tribune's correspondent, June 5, thought that only prudence restrained the Southern party, as the speech was more severe than thuld hinder the admission of Kansas as a free State, New York Times, June 6; New York Tribune, June 5; New York Evening Post, June 5. This last journal qualified its criticism two days after, and aJune 5. This last journal qualified its criticism two days after, and afterwards (May 1, 1812, and again April 8, 1865) thought Sumner justified by what had occurred during the Civil War. The New York Tribune printed the speech in its weekly issue, read chiefly in the co