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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 3: closing of Southern ports.--increase of the Navy.--list of vessels and their stations.--purchased vessels.--vessels constructing, etc. (search)
r 5 Powhatan Steamer 11 8 vessels   162   The Powhatan arrived at New York March 12, 1861, and sailed early in April for Fort Pickens. The Pocahontas reached Hampton Roads on the 12th of March, and the Cumberland on the 23d of the same month. Of vessels on foreign stations the following had returned in obedience to orders from the Department. From Mediterranean: Name. Class. No. of Guns. Date of Arrival. Richmond Steam Sloop 16 July 3. Susquehanna Steam Sloop 15 June 6. Iroquois Steam Sloop 6 June 15. From coast of Africa: Name. Class. No. of Guns. Date of Arrival. Constellation Sloop 22 Sept. 28. Portsmouth Sloop 22 Sept. 23. Mohican Steam Sloop 6 Sept. 27. Mystic Steamer 5 Oct. 7. Sumter Steamer 5 Sept. 15. San Jacinto Steam Sloop 13 Nov. 15. Relief Storeship. 2 Oct. 12. From coast of Brazil: Name. Class. No. of Guns. Date of Arrival. Congress Frigate 50 August 12. Seminole Steam Sloop 5 July 6. The fol
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
battle and they were mostly employed, as at Milliken's Bend, in guarding stores or in other duty, where they could relieve white soldiers sent to the front. As far as appearances went, the colored troops were good soldiers and many enthusiasts declared that they would stand the shock of arms as well as the whites. At Milliken's Bend was also a portion of a white regiment which was looked upon by those who were not enthusiasts as by far the most reliable part of the garrison. On the 6th of June, the Admiral, who had general charge of matters in that quarter, hearing that some of the enemy's troops had been seen hovering around Milliken's Bend, sent the Choctaw, Lieutenant-Commander F. M. Ramsay, up to that place with orders to be ready for an emergency At 2.15 A. M., on the 7th instant, an Army officer hailed the Choctaw and reported that his pickets had been attacked and driven in by the enemy. A few minutes later firing was heard in the main camp. The Choctaw immediately ope