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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
d to the families of volunteers; and on the 13th of November the selectmen were directed to continue the payment of State aid to the families of deceased soldiers. 1864. At a meeting held on the 28th of March, the chairman of the selectmen was directed to go to Boston and ascertain if the quota of the town on the previous calls had been filled ; and that he be authorized to secure volunteers to fill all calls up to the present time, if they can be obtained at a reasonable rate. On the 6th of June the town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each recruit who enlists to the credit of the town, up to March next. 1865. At a meeting held on the 13th of March, the town voted to raise one thousand dollars for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers; and the selectmen were directed to continue recruiting, to keep the quota of the town always full. Savoy furnished about ninety-five men for the war, which was a surplus of ten over and above all
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
ndred dollars for the payment of bounties, and to reimburse citizens who had advanced money to assist in filling the quotas of the town. It was further voted, that the selectmen furnish a statement of the amount of money raised by individuals by voluntary contribution, to encourage volunteers to enlist; and where they have fully obtained the whole amount so paid, they shall hand it over to the assessors, who shall assess the amount upon the property of the town. At a meeting held on the 6th of June, the selectmen were authorized to make a contract with the city authorities of New Bedford, to have a portion of their surplus of volunteers transferred to Acushnet, under the pending call. The arrangement was made; but it was subsequently ascertained that the men so transferred rightly belonged to Acushnet, they having enlisted in the navy from that town. The town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who should enlist prior to March 1, 1865, a
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
o raise eighteen hundred dollars to pay the same. August 23d, Voted, to pay the same bounty to men enlisting for nine months service. 1863. Nothing of special interest was acted upon in town-meeting in regard to military matters. 1864. April 4th, The selectmen were authorized to hire the number of men necessary to fill the quota of the town under the recent call of the President for two hundred thousand volunteers, and to pay each man a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars. June 6th, Gary Munson and E. W. Lathrop were appointed to procure volunteers to the credit of the town, to fill the present demand and all future demands which may be made upon it; also, to pay a bounty of three hundred dollars to each citizen of the town who has been, or may be, drafted and mustered into the military service to fill the quota of the town. July 30th, Voted, to pay a bounty of fifty dollars to each volunteer for one year's service, eighty dollars to each for two years, and one hundr
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
was unanimously voted to authorize the treasurer, under the direction of the selectmen, to refund the money contributed for recruiting purposes by private citizens of the town during the year 1863, and to raise the same by taxation; also to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each of five men who will volunteer to fill the quota of the town, under the last call of the President for two hundred thousand men; and William Winn and Oakes Tirrill were chosen to recruit them. June 6th, Voted, to pay the same bounty to volunteers until the 1st of March, 1865, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow such sums of money as may be required to pay bounties. 1865. June 9th, Voted, to reimburse the money raised by subscription during the past year, though not till after being assessed and paid into the treasury. Burlington furnished eighty-two men for the war, which was a surplus of four over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Suffolk County. (search)
ght and died. Regretting that it is dishonored by a portion of our country, we hope its stars may never be less, and that we may live long under its protection. With high regard,— Mrs. William A. Williams, Mrs. G. H. Rice, Mrs. Charles Howard, Mrs. J. Duff Brown, Mrs. Theo. C. Merrill, Mrs. C. A. Blanchard, Mrs. L. W. Merrill, Mrs. Phillip B. Lowe, Mrs. Louise H. Walker, Mrs. H. C. Burgess, Mrs. C. F. Haynes, Mrs. J. Stone, Miss Lucy A. Bliss, Mrs. Rebecca S. Lash, Mrs. E. C. Bliss. June 6th, Three thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families, as provided by law, to be expended under the direction of the mayor and aldermen. The committee on police was authorized to pay State aid for the present to those families that were in immediate want of assistance. August 15th, It was ordered by the aldermen that a joint special committee be appointed to consider and report what action was necessary on the part of the city government in relation