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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 178 178 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 25 25 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 15 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 10 10 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 7 7 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 6 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for June 7th or search for June 7th in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 38: repeal of the Missouri Compromise.—reply to Butler and Mason.—the Republican Party.—address on Granville Sharp.—friendly correspondence.—1853-1854. (search)
ion. Works, vol. III. p. 336. Whittier wrote of the speech: It was everywhere commended. Indeed, all things considered, I think it the best speech of the session. It was the fitting word; it entirely satisfied me; and with a glow of heart I thanked God that its author was my friend. Hillard wrote, June 2: Your last brief speech on the Nebraska bill is capital,—I think the best speech you have ever made. The mixture of dignity and spirit is most happy. The Springfield Republican, June 7, called it brief, eloquent, and to the point; and later, while expressing a preference for a man of a different type for senator, it said: Where lives the man who has more thoroughly proclaimed and vindicated the sentiment of the North during the past winter than Charles Sumner? Even the Atlas, June 12, commended his consistent and unwavering fidelity to freedom. The seizure of a fugitive slave in Boston intensified the agitation in New England. While the Senate was engaged in the disc
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
eback, and another horse with my trunk led by a person on foot; traversed the mountain to Argeles, where I arrived about five o'clock; on the top was snow. Gave up going to Cauterets, to rest at the pleasant inn of Argeles; weary, very weary; on the way passed shepherds on the mountain. June 6. Left Argeles (after a night sleepless from fatigue) in a private carriage for Bagneres de Bigorre; then took another carriage for St. Gaudens, where I arrived about nine o'clock in the evening. June 7. In the diligence, hot and dusty, over the plains of Languedoc to Toulouse, which interested me much. June 8. Early in the morning took the train eastward; passed the day at Carcassonne, in order to explore its well-preserved and venerable ruins, reviving the Middle Ages; in the evening went on, passing ancient Narbonne and Beziers to Cette, where I arrived at midnight. June 9. Early again reached Montpellier at seven o'clock; rambled through its streets, visited its museum, and took t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
d avoid the strain of trusting only to the memory. The audience in the galleries was not large, as the interest in the debate on slavery had been transferred from Congress to the country. The account of the scene is compiled from letters to newspapers. Boston Traveller, June 9, by E. L. Pierce; Boston Journal, June 6, by B. P. Poore; Boston Atlas and Bee, June 11, by James Parker; New York Independent, June 14, by D. W. Bartlett; New York Tribune, June 5; New York Evening Post, June 5 and 7; Chautauqua (N. Y.) Democrat, June 13; Iowa City Republican, June 20. W. M. Dickson, of the Cincinnati bar, gave a vivid description of the scene, several years later, in a letter to the writer, and afterwards published it in the Cincinnati Commercial, Nov. 28, 1877. The Vice-President, Breckinridge, during the morning hour called Fitzpatrick of Alabama to the chair. Sumner, as soon as the Kansas bill was called up, took the floor and proceeded with his speech, reading from the printed slips