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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 270 270 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 16 16 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 8 8 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 8 8 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 8 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for June 8th or search for June 8th in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 1 (search)
try; and the work of removing the machinery of the armory, begun by Governor Letcher's orders, was continued. Two heavy guns on naval carriages, that had been placed in battery on the west side of the village by Colonel Jackson's direction, were mounted on Furnace Ridge. My predecessors had constructed two very slight outworks, one on the summit of the mountain on the Maryland side of the Potomac, the other on the Loudon Heights. Before the end of the first week in June the Seventh and Eighth Georgia and Second Tennessee regiments had arrived. About the 10th of the month, General Patterson, who had been organizing and instructing his troops at Chambersburg, advanced from that place to Hagerstown. According to the information we could obtain from scouts and intelligent people of the country, they amounted to about eighteen thousand men. The organization of this army, as published in a newspaper of Hagerstown, corresponded very well with this estimate; for twenty-four regiment
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
ered the proper person to withdraw troops from it, if you deemed it judicious. XIV. On the 8th June the Secretary was more explicit, if possible. He said: Do you advise more reinforcements from s conclusive. XXVII. The telegram of the Secretary of War of 5th June, followed by that of 8th June, conveyed unmistakably the very reverse of the meaning you attribute to them, and your referencetation of his own orders was conclusive. That in question was interpreted in a telegram dated June 8th, five or six weeks before this letter left his office. This explanation made all arguments and have its evidence for the first time in your letter. The dispatch of the Secretary of War, of June 8th, received on the 10th, removed my misapprehension. III. In regard to the repetition and perave error. This error of mine, which was removed by the dispatch of the War Department, dated June 8th, and which had no effect on my military course, does not seem to me, I must confess, a grave on
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
neral J. E. Johnston: General — was believed to be peculiarly acceptable to his brigade. What is the objection? Do you advise more reenforcements from General Bragg? You, as commandant of the department, have the power so to order, if you, in view of the whole case, so determine. We cannot send from Virginia or elsewhere, for we stand already not one to two. (Signed) J. A. Seddon, Secretary of War. Jackson, June 10, 1863. Hon. J. A. Seddon, Secretary of War: Your dispatch of June 8th, in cipher, received. You do not give orders in regard to the recently-appointed general officers. I have not at my command half the number of troops necessary. It is for the Government to determine what department, if any, can furnish the troops required. I cannot know here General Bragg's wants compared with mine. The Government can make such comparisons. Your dispatch is imperfectly deciphered. J. E. Johnston. Jackson, June 12, 1863. Hon. Hon. J. A. Seddon, Secretary of War: