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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 270 270 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 16 16 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 8 8 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 8 8 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 8 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for June 8th or search for June 8th in all documents.

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ts of arms and munitions of war in Europe, destined for New Orleans and Mobile. Believing it of primary importance that this shipment should, if possible, be intercepted, and its landing prevented, Capt. McKean was directed to proceed to the Gulf for that purpose; and the Harriet Lane was ordered to Charleston, to take the place of the Niagara before that port. Flag-officer Mervine left Boston in the Mississippi in advance of his flag-ship, the Colorado, and arrived in the Gulf on the 8th of June. Previous to his arrival, an embargo or blockade of the Mississippi River, and some of the principal ports on the Gulf, had been commenced, and has been since vigorously maintained and enforced. As the Constitution declares that no preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce or revenue to the ports of one State over another, and also that no State shall, without the consent of Congress, lay any imposts or duties on imports or exports, except what may be absolutely necessar
assports issued by authority of the Executive of the Confederate States, or of this State. And if any such persons are now within the limits of Texas, they are hereby warned to depart within twenty days of this date, or they will be arrested as spies; and all citizens of the State of Texas are warned from holding any friendly communication whatsoever with such persons. The Executive has issued this proclamation impelled by the belief that public safety required it, and he relies upon the people to sustain him, and to aid him in discovering and bringing to just and lawful punishment any one who may disregard his duty as therein set forth. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto signed my name, and caused the great seal of the State to be affixed, at the city of Austin, this the eighth day of June, A. D. 1861, and in the year of the independence of Texas the twenty-sixth, and of the Confederate States the first. By the Governor, Edward Clark. Bird Holland, Secretary of State.