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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 270 270 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 16 16 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 8 8 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 8 8 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 8 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for June 8th or search for June 8th in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 7 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
ittee of thirteen was appointed, to carry out promptly and energetically the purpose of the third resolution. This committee presented, forthwith, an enlistment paper; and several young men immediately signed it, amidst great applause. A subscription paper was also drawn up, and presented; and, in a few minutes, forty-seven hundred dollars were subscribed, all of which, with the exception of thirty dollars, by citizens of Great Barrington. The first legal town-meeting was held on the 8th of June, at which liberal measures were adopted to provide for the payment of State aid to the families of the volunteers, in accordance with the act of the Legislature passed at the late extra session; and the treasurer of the town was authorized to borrow two thousand dollars, to serve as a fund for that purpose. 1862. A call having been made by the President for an additional three hundred thousand men July 4th, a legal town-meeting was held on the 19th of July; at which it was voted that i
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
the entrance, was set apart as a soldiers' burial-place. Colonel Richard Borden has erected a splendid marble monument on this lot, with tablets and military emblems. 1864. February 20th. A committee was appointed to make arrangements for the reception of Company G, Twenty-sixth Regiment. Two thousand dollars were appropriated to pay expenses attending enlistment services. April 4th, The bounty to volunteers for three years service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. June 8th, A committee was appointed to make arrangements for the reception of Companies A and B of the Seventh Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers. 1865. May 17th, It was voted as follows:— Whereas the President of the United States has by proclamation recommended the observance of the first day of June as a day of mourning, in consequence of the death of our late beloved and honored Chief Magistrate, Abraham Lincoln; therefore— Ordered, That we do take measures for an appropriate observance
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
authorized to borrow money to pay these bounties. 1863. January 1st, The selectmen were authorized to fill the quota called for under the last call of the President, and to pay such bounties as might be necessary to procure the men. 1864. June 8th, Voted, that a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars be paid to all volunteers who shall enlist and be credited to the town during the year. Enfield furnished about one hundred and seven men for the war, which was a surplus of nine ovnteers, as may enlist from Hadley, either native or adopted citizens, for at least three months; also, fifteen hundred dollars to pay to each volunteer a sum sufficient to make his monthly pay twenty-six dollars a month while in actual service. June 8th, Voted, that each person who has enlisted in the military service from Hadley for three years shall be paid a bounty of fifty dollars. September 24th, This bounty was authorized to be paid to three-years volunteers until March 1st, 1862. 1862
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
the families of volunteers. May 15th, The ladies of the First Universalist Church made an offer of $304.25, contributed by said society for aid to volunteers. June 8th, Two hundred dollars were voted to Captain John T. Burgess, for expenses incurred by him in raising a company of volunteers, which was afterwards increased to thThe selectmen were authorized to give such assistance to the families of volunteers as they might think proper, this to be in addition to the aid allowed by law. June 8th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow a sum not exceeding one thousand dollars for the benefit of the families of deceased or disabled soldiers. 1864. Marchthe families of enlisted men; also, that ten thousand dollars be raised by taxation to refund to citizens money which they had advanced for recruiting purposes. June 8th, The selectmen were authorized to appoint three agents to look after the sick and wounded soldiers from that town, and to provide at the expense of the town for
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
instructed to give public notice when they would give hearings to parties interested in obtaining said aid. November 23d, Voted, to appropriate one thousand dollars to defray the expense of recruiting. Twenty-two citizens were chosen to serve without pay to aid the selectmen in recruiting volunteers. 1864. May 20th, Voted, that the treasurer be authorized to borrow ten thousand dollars to aid in recruiting volunteers to fill the quota of the town under the last call of the President. June 8th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist and be mustered in to the credit of the town under any future call of the President for more men; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow fifteen thousand dollars to pay the same. The selectmen were also instructed to receive in Boston, Company H, of the Twelfth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, on its return from the war, and escort it free of expense to Weymouth Landing; and that member
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
d dollars to be regarded as a war fund for the defence of our rights; to pay a gratuity of ten dollars to each inhabitant of Marshfield who has enlisted or may hereafter enlist; to pay each volunteer sufficient, when added to what he receives from the Government, to make twenty-five dollars a month, and five dollars extra to those who have families; to accept the patriotic services of the ladies, who have volunteered to make clothing for our soldiers. Another town-meeting was held on the 8th of June, at which the selectmen were instructed to furnish all necessary articles for the soldiers, and to fulfil all contracts entered into by the town so far as the same can be done legally. At a meeting held on the 6th of July the town voted to pay State aid to the families of soldiers in the service, as provided by the act of the Legislature, the same to be continued as long as the soldier remains in the service. It was also voted that the selectmen distribute the clothing in their possessi
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
held May 6th, at which it was voted to raise one thousand dollars to be appropriated for the benefit of such volunteers as shall be or are now employed in the military service of the Government, and to the wants of their families while absent. June 8th, Voted, to send five dollars to each of the two three-months volunteers then in the service, belonging to Auburn. 1862. July 26th, Nine men having been called for as the quota of the town under a new requisition, it was voted to give each a ittee having in charge the disbursement of the ten thousand dollars was given discretionary power to pay any bills contracted by the two military companies belonging to the town, as well before as after they shall be called into actual service. June 8th, The act of the Legislature concerning the payment of State aid to soldiers' families was adopted, and ten thousand dollars were appropriated to carry into effect its provisions. November 5th, The selectmen were authorized to send agents to the