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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 608 608 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 49 49 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 22 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 18 18 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 12 12 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for June 10th or search for June 10th in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Grant on the Wilderness campaign. (search)
he enemy's right flank, where I felt I could cut off all his sources of supply, except by the canal. On the 7th, two divisions of cavalry, under General Sheridan, got off on the expedition against the Virginia Central Railroad, with instructions to Hunter, whom I hoped he would meet near Charlottesville, to join his forces to Sheridan's; and after the work laid out for them was thoroughly done, to join the Army of the Potomac by the route laid down in Sheridan's instructions. On the 10th of June General Butler sent a force of infantry under General Gillmore, and of cavalry under General Kautz, to capture Petersburg, if possible, and destroy the railroad and common bridges across the Appomattox. The cavalry carried the works on the south side, and penetrated well in toward the town, but were forced to retire. General Gillmore, finding the works which he approached very strong, and deeming an assault impracticable, returned to Bermuda Hundred without attempting one. Attaching
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
rtillery, was instructed to strengthen the other with a line of redoubts devised by himself. The troops took the first position in the morning of the 3d, and as General Sherman was strengthening his right greatly, they were transferred to the second in the morning of the 5th. The cavalry of our left had been supported in the previous few days by a division of State troops commanded by Major-General G. W. Smith. As General Sherman says, i.t was really a continuous battle lasting from June 10th to July 3d. The army occupied positions about Marietta twenty-six days, in which the want of artillery ammunition was especially felt; in all those days we were exposed to an almost incessant fire of artillery as well as musketry — the former being the more harassing, because it could not be returned; for our supply of artillery ammunition was so small that we were compelled to reserve it for battles and serious assaults. In the new position each corps had two pontoon-bridges laid. Ab
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
and, 4477 for duty, which was increased to 5120 by June 10th. On the 19th of May, at Cassville, the division oomparison of the return of April 30th with that of June 10th shows an increase to the fighting strength of the y. The return of May 20th is missing, but that of June 10th shows an increase since May 20th of 649 returned fal Johnston has to account, between April 30th and June 10th, for at least the following men available for battryMay 17th 4,477 Jackson's cavalry increase beforeJune 10th643 Quarles's brigadeMay 26th 2,200 Two regimentsive, p. 575. The return of General Johnston's Army June 10th is the first on file in the War Department that in, May 7th to 20th, inclusive, 3384. The return of June 10th shows 1551 killed and died since May 20th, indicatn gives only the effective total. ) The loss since June 10th is accounted for by 1114 dead, 711 deserters, 1042 with a loss of one thousand men. These divisions, June 10th, numbered over eleven thousand for duty. Their lo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
ig.-Gen. Charles G. Harker, Brig.-Gen. Luther P. Bradley: 22d Ill., Relieved for muster-out June 10th and August 25th, respectively. Lieut.-Col. Francis Swanwick; 27th Ill., Relieved for muster-out June 10th and August 25th, respectively. Lieut.-Col. William A. Schmitt; 42d Ill., Lieut.-Col. Edgar D. Swain, Capt. Jared W. Richards, Maj. Frederick A. Atwater; 51st Ill., Col. Luther P. BradlB. Turchin, Col. Moses B. Walker: 19th Ill., Relieved for muster-out June 9th, June 28th, and June 10th, respectively. Lieut.-Col. Alexander W. Raffen; 24th Ill., Relieved for muster-out June 9th, June 28th, and June 10th, respectively. Capt. August Mauff; 82d Ind., Col. Morton C. Hunter; 23d Mo., Joined July 10th. Col. William P. Robinson; 11th Ohio, Relieved for muster-out June 9th, June 28th, and June 10th, respectively. Lieut.-Col. Ogden Street; 17th Ohio, Col. Durbin Ward; 31st Ohio, Col. M. B. Walker, Lieut.-Col. Frederick W. Lister; 89th Ohio, Maj. John H. Jolly, Col. Caleb
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cavalry operations in the West under Rosecrans and Sherman. (search)
sippi. The expedition proved a failure, and returned to Memphis. [See foot-note, p. 247, and article, p. 416.] In March and April, 1864, Forrest advanced from Mississippi with a large force, and passed through western Tennessee to Paducah, Kentucky. Returning, he reached Fort Pillow on the morning of April 12th, and captured the fort. [See p. 418.] Forrest was pursued by General S. D. Sturgis from Memphis, but turned upon him, and signally defeated him at Brice's Cross Roads on the 10th of June, and pursued him back to Memphis. [See p. 420.] On the 14th of July Forrest was in turn defeated near Tupelo by A. J. Smith. Forrest remained in west Tennessee and northern Mississippi and northern Alabama, until he joined Hood in the Tennessee campaign. The cavalry which Sherman assembled at Chattanooga for the Atlanta campaign numbered about 15,000 in four divisions. [For organization, see pp. 286 and 289.] In the new organization General Stanley was assigned to duty with the infa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Forrest's defeat of Sturgis at Brice's cross-roads (June 10th, 1864). (search)
ve thousand men with two 6-gun batteries. The whole, as a division, was commanded by Colonel W. L. McMillen. The expedition had a new and complete supply train with eighteen days rations. Adding regimental wagons, there were in all 250, exclusive of ambulances and medical wagons. June 8th the command reached Ripley, about eighty miles from its starting-point, and on the following night it encamped at Stubb's Farm, fourteen miles south from Ripley. At 5 o'clock on the morning of June 10th Waring's brigade, in advance, moved southward in the direction of Brice's plantation, followed by Winslow's brigade, the infantry, and the train, the latter guarded by the brigade of colored troops. The advance found the fences down, as if for an engagement, and two small bridges over the road taken up. About half-past 9 o'clock it reached Brice's Cross-roads, about eleven miles from Stubb's Farm. [See map, p. 414.] The road on which the command was marching ran nearly north and south