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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 608 608 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 49 49 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 22 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 18 18 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 14 14 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for June 10th or search for June 10th in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 56: commerce-destroyers.-their inception, remarkable career, and ending. (search)
ant Charles W. Read, formerly a midshipman in the U. S. Navy--and another Confederate State's vessel-of-war was created in the shortest possible time, with orders to burn, sink and destroy; although it was doubtful if Maffitt's authority to commission vessels would have been recognized in case he should have fallen in with a superior force. Lieutenant Read was bold and full of resources, seeming to disdain all danger. He shaped his course for the coast of the United States, and by the 10th of June had captured five vessels, four of which were destroyed. The fifth was the schooner Tacony, and this vessel, being better suited to his purpose than the Clarence. Read burned the latter, after transferring her crew, guns and stores to the Tacony. During the next fortnight the Tacony made ten prizes. Here was a Confederate cruiser right upon the coast, burning and sinking coasting vessels with impunity, for not a single United States vessel was to be seen. This was a new style of wa