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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 436 436 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 39 39 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 18 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 15 15 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 13 13 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 10 10 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 9 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 9 9 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for June 14th or search for June 14th in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
threw his army across the James River, with the hope of seizing Petersburg, while his cavalry could destroy the railroad communication between Richmond and the Shenandoah Valley and Lynchburg. The movement was skillfully executed, and, on the 14th of June, the Army was safe on the opposite bank of the James, and in communication with the Army of the James and with the Navy. The day General Grant passed the James he gave an order to sink the obstructions in Trent's Reach, and on the 15th Gene the credit of which was given to General Butler. who simply approved the proposition when it was mentioned to him, and received General Grant's order to sink the vessels. General Grant's arrival before Petersburg, which he attacked on the 14th of June, and the crossing of the James by General Meade's army, gave quite a different aspect to affairs at City Point, and the time had arrived when the Navy stood a chance of making itself very useful. Petersburg was one of the strongest outposts