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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 554 554 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 23 23 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 20 20 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 12 12 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 10 10 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 8 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 7 7 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for June 16th or search for June 16th in all documents.

Your search returned 23 results in 21 document sections:

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
nt-General. General Hunter immediately took up the offensive, and moving up the Shenandoah Valley, met the enemy on the 5th of June at Piedmont, and after a battle of ten hours routed and defeated him, capturing on the field of battle 1,500 men) 3 pieces of artillery, and 300 stand of small-arms. On the 8th of the same month he formed a junction with Crook and Averell at Staunton, from which place he moved direct on Lynchburg, via Lexington, which place he reached and invested on the 16th day of June. Up to this time he was very successful, and but for the difficulty of taking with him sufficient ordnance stores over so long a march through a hostile country, he would no doubt have captured that (to the enemy) important point. The destruction of the enemy's supplies and manufactories was very great. To meet this movement under General Hunter, General Lee sent a force, perhaps equal to a corps, a part of which reached Lynchburg a short time before Hunter. After some skirmishing o
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
d prudent to deploy a portion of the advanced line. I moved up General Stanley to cover General Newton's right flank. In the meanwhile General Newton had driven the enemy's skirmishers within his main works and reported them so thoroughly constructed and so well manned that I deemed it improper to risk an assault without a further reconnaissance, besides, the day was already nearly spent. General Thomas approved of my action and directed me to fortify where I then was. The next day, June 16, two batteries were constructed on our skirmish line. In the one on Stanley's front a valuable officer, Captain Sironson, General Stanley's chief of artillery, was killed. During the night these two batteries were connected by main lines of intrenchments and our troops moved into them. The position of a part of these lines was such that the enemy's skirmishers had to be pushed back to gain it. The whole line was then in close proximity to the enemy's works. Doubtless believing that w
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
ade advanced three-fourths of a mile; 2 p. m. formed in double column, three battalions front. 5 p. m. advanced to the front and right, deployed in position on the right of General Grose; advanced strong line of skirmishers under a brisk fire. June 16, skirmishers briskly engaged the entire day. During the day the Thirty-first Indiana and part of the Ninetieth Ohio intrenched on the skirmish line in an open field and immediately under the enemy's guns, performing their work gallantly. The Nin. July 10, at 10 a. m. marched on road leading up the river, camped within one mile of pontoon crossing. July 11, occupied same position. July 12, crossed the river and went into position on high bluff one mile below crossing. July 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17, occupied same position. July 18, brigade marched out Atlanta road at 5 a. m., following General Newton's division; camped near Buck Head. July 19, marched about three miles and went into position on left of division. July 20, marched in
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
rong position on Pine Mountain in my front. Skirmishing commenced and continued until the night of June 13, when the enemy retreated and my brigade advanced upon the mountain early on the morning of June 14. On this mountain is where Bishop Polk, general of the rebel army, fell by a shot from the Fifth Indiana Artillery, Captain Simonson. The battery was in position at the front and right of my lines. We pursued the enemy two miles to his new position, and found him strongly fortified. June 16, advanced my lines of trenches, with hard skirmishing. On this day we had the sad misfortune to lose the brave and gallant officer, Captain Simonson, our chief of artillery. June 17, the enemy again withdrew; we pursued, Wood's division in front, with heavy skirmishing. June 19, the enemy retired during the night; we pursued, my brigade in advance. After proceeding two miles we came upon the enemy upon the east side of a large farm. My lines were formed for an attack. The Ninth and
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
ng in our front. June 14, moved one-half mile to the left, and encamped for the night. June 15, the enemy evacuated our front early this morning and were immediately followed, my regiment in advance of the division. After marching nearly three miles Company A came upon the enemy; it being deployed as skirmishers, we drove the enemy about one mile farther, when we stopped and built a line of works, and remained in them during the night. Casualties during the day, 2 men severely wounded. June 16, occupy the same position we held last evening, during the day and night. June 17, the enemy evacuated our front some time during the night, and were immediately followed by our troops; only their left gave way that evening. Our line of battle was nearly at right angles with that of last evening, General Wood's division in front. June 18, we were in reserve during the day; the enemy were driven considerable distance by General Wood's division. June 19, the enemy left our front during th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
n the second line in the same position as on the 10th. On Monday, June 13, the regiment moved one mile to the left, and threw up new works during the night. The rebels in front evacuated the same night. On Tuesday, June 14, the regiment moved forward one mile; finding the enemy in force, we here threw up new works; casualties, 1 enlisted man wounded. On Wednesday, June 15, the regiment continued in the same position as on the 14th. We had some skirmishing, but — no casualties. On Thursday, June 16, the operations were the same as on the 14th and 15th; the casualties of the regiment, 1 enlisted man wounded. During the night the rebels fell back. On Friday, June 17, the regiment moved forward some distance and went into camp. There was heavy skirmishing along the line, but my regiment was not engaged. On Saturday, June 18, the skirmishing still continued, but the brigade to which my regiment belongs was in reserve, consequently we were not engaged. On Sunday, June 19, we agai
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
ed as skirmishers, under command of Colonel Bradley, Fifty-first Illinois, who conducted the advance with great skill. The enemy's skirmishers were steadily driven out of skirmish pits in strong positions, and forced back to their main line of works, the strength of which, in the opinion of General Howard, forbade an attack with my main force. The division encamped for the night within 700 yards of the enemy's works, General Stanley's division on the right, the Fourth Corps on the left. June 16, advanced the left of my position; the enemy retired at night. June 17, advanced, following General Wood's division, about 400 yards. In the afternoon went into position on his left, strengthened my skirmish line, which, under charge of Colonel Lane, Ninety-seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, gallantly advanced across an open field, and carried the enemy's skirmish pits. June 18, skirmishers, under command of Colonel Bartleson, One hundredth Illinois, advanced a considerable distance to the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
mained at this place until June 14. The roads were very bad by reason of daily heavy rains. June 14, advanced one mile. June 15, from 2 p. m. to 6 p. m., advanced two miles, regiment being formed in close column by division, and bayonets fixed, in momentary expectation of a charge. At 6 p. m., enemy being found strongly posted in our immediate front, the brigade halted and immediately built a line of works, where we lay for the night. During the day there had been constant skirmishing. June 16, at 3 a. m. regiment moved forward and relieved troops in reserve of skirmish line, and built a line of works. Regiment went on picket. Loss this day, 3 men wounded. June 17, at daylight it was discovered that the enemy had abandoned during the night his works in our immediate front. The regiment immediately advanced as skirmishers and occupied these works. Were relieved at 8 a. m. During the day the brigade advanced about one mile. June 18, this morning the regiment was in support of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
resting. June 10, marched at 11 a. m. through mud and rain three miles and confronted the enemy near Pine Mountain. June 11, occupied in getting into positions, rain falling in such quantities as almost to prevent operations. June 12 and 13, active operations are suspended on account of excessive wet weather. June 14. regiment on picket, nothing of importance transpiring. June 15, the enemy evacuated our front; followed two miles, when we again encountered him behind strong works. June 16, heavy artillery firing, but no movement on our part. June 17, advanced our lines a short distance. June 18, the lines are extended, the One hundred and twenty-fifth moves a short distance to the right and fortifies. June 19, the enemy having evacuated during last night, our lines are advanced two miles, when we again encountered him at the base of Kenesaw, on the northeast side of the mountain. Heavy cannonading is opened. Lieut. Freeman Collins is killed by a fragment of shell, 2 men
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
of Pine Top Knob. June 11, 12, 13, and 14, remained in this position, constantly skirmishing, with a few casualties daily. Tuesday night, June 14, the enemy evacuated Pine. Top Knob, retiring to his intrenched lines half a mile south of it. Wednesday, June 15, the Second Division of the corps was ordered to assault the enemy's works, and my division was ordered to support it. However, the assault was not made, and the corps remained in the position of Wednesday afternoon throughout Thursday, June 16, carrying on the usual skirmishing with the enemy. Thursday night the enemy evacuated his lines, crossed Muddy Creek, and swung back toward Kenesaw Mountain. Thus was he forced from his sixth strongly intrenched position. Early Friday morning the Fourth Corps followed up the enemy, my division leading. The day was spent in driving the enemy's skirmishers and outposts across Muddy Creek. Saturday, June 18, was spent in heavy skirmishing. Saturday night the enemy evacuated his seven
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