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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 682 682 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 29 29 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 27 27 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 24 24 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 18 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 14 14 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 13 13 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 12 12 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 22, 1863., [Electronic resource] 9 9 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for June 17th or search for June 17th in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 7 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 1: introductory and explanatory. (search)
markable letter, Mr. Cameron says: It is important to reduce rather than to enlarge this number (six regiments), and in no event to exceed it. Let me earnestly recommend to you therefore to call for no more than eight regiments, Two three-months regiments had previously been called for, and were included in the eight referred to. of which six only are to serve for three years, or during the war, and if more are already called for to reduce the number by discharge. It was not until the 17th of June succeeding, that Governor Andrew, with all his knowledge and ability, could prevail upon the Secretary to accept the four additional regiments which had been organized, and were in camp, expecting their services would be accepted. We mention these facts to show how gentlemen in the highest official positions, and possessing the best means of information upon which to form an accurate judgment, were mistaken in their estimate of the crisis precipitated upon the country in April, 1861, and
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
r more men. July 26th, Voted, to raise money by taxation, and to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist to fill the quota of the town, under the call of the President dated July 18, 1864. 1835. June 17th, Voted, to refund all money contributed by individuals during 1864, in aid of recruiting men to fill the quota of the town, provided the claim shall be presented in writing to the selectmen before the first day of January next; and persons who two thousand dollars to be expended in procuring volunteers. March 29th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow $5,125, to pay the expense of filling the quota of the town under the pending call of the President for five hundred thousand men. June 17th, The selectmen were directed to borrow, not exceeding ten thousand dollars, for procuring volunteers from time to time, as they may be called for. December 12th, Voted, to assess a tax upon the property and polls of the town sufficient to pay
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
The town-treasurer during all of these years was Grover Dodge. 1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 17th of June; at which one thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid during the year to the families of volunteers, to be paid in accordance with theartin and private John C. Dow, who were killed at Antietam. 1863. January 28th, Forty thousand dollars were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. June 17th, Five hundred dollars were voted to give a suitable reception to the Lynn companies, D, I, and F, of the Eighth Regiment, on their return from nine months servicas authorized to borrow five thousand dollars for the relief of the families of the soldiers who have gone, or are going, to fight the battles of their country. June 17th, Voted, to borrow ten thousand dollars to be applied by the selectmen, in accordance with an act of the Legislature approved May 23d, in aid of the families of v
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
ed by Hon. John Wells, and adopted:— Whereas the Government of the United States is now engaged in a struggle for the maintenance of the Constitution and laws, and whereas the continuance and preservation of our free institutions and the liberties of the people are involved in the contest; therefore— Resolved, That it is the duty of every town to contribute, to the extent of its means, to the promotion of the common cause of sustaining the Government in this crisis of its peril. June 17th, Three thousand dollars were appropriated, to be expended under the direction of the selectmen, for State aid to the families of volunteers, as provided by law. 1862. August 22d, The bounty to each volunteer for nine months service, who should enlist and be credited to the quota of the town, was fixed at one hundred dollars; and twelve thousand dollars were appropriated to pay the same, and for incidental expenses in recruiting the men. The treasurer was authorized to borrow the money.
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
a special tax be, and hereby is, laid upon the inhabitants of this town to the amount of ten thousand dollars, for the benefit of the residents of this town who offer themselves, or who may be mustered into the service of the United States. June 17th, The selectmen were authorized to pay any demand, arising from the equipment and support of the volunteers sent from this town, which in their judgment constitutes an equitable charge against the town. This has reference to Company C, Tenth Lewis Bodman and D. F. Martin were joined with the selectmen to disburse the money raised for volunteers and their families. They were instructed to furnish equipments for volunteers, and to pay to each ten dollars a month while in service. June 17th, The above vote was reconsidered, and it was voted that the selectmen have power to borrow eleven hundred dollars to fulfil contracts already made with volunteers, and to furnish aid to their families, as provided by act of the Legislature.
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
ot, Josiah Bowers, George P. Elliot, Stephen Gilman, Edward Spaulding, Jona Merriam, and Peter B. Bohonan were chosen the committee of nine. It was then voted to add to the committee R. T. Bryant, Joseph Down, Leander Crosby and John Baldwin. June 17th, The committee reported that, under the recent acts of the legislature, all appropriations made in aid of the families of volunteers must be expended under the direction of the selectmen. It was then voted to rescind the vote of the 6th of May of Ladd and Whitney was to have taken place on the 19th, the fourth anniversary of their heroic death; but at the request of Governor Andrew, who was to deliver the address, it was postponed on account of the death of the President until the 17th of June, the anniversary of the battle of Bunker Hill. On the occasion of the dedication of the monument the people of Lowell and of the surrounding towns observed it as a holiday. The mills were stopped, the stores closed, and business of every k
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
and town-treasurer during all the years of the war was Franklin Este. 1861. April 29th, Voted, unanimously, that the town is ready to respond to the proclamation of the President, with every able-bodied citizen and every dollar if necessary; also, to pay volunteers with families twelve dollars a month, and those who have no families eight dollars a month while in active service. Volunteers were to be paid fifteen cents an hour or sixty cents each day for four hours spent in drilling. June 17th, The votes in regard to monthly pay were reconsidered, and the town voted to pay State aid to the families of volunteers as provided by law. The selectmen were directed to pay all expenses already incurred for outfits and uniforms to the soldiers. 1862. July 28th, The bounty to volunteers for three years service was fixed at one hundred dollars; but on the 16th of August it was increased to one hundred and fifty dollars. September 1st, The selectmen were directed to pay a bounty of one