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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 682 682 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 29 29 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 27 27 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 24 24 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 18 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 14 14 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 13 13 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 12 12 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 22, 1863., [Electronic resource] 9 9 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907. You can also browse the collection for June 17th or search for June 17th in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

ularly attending the Wednesday holiday, the influence of the Sabbath having a tendency to counteract the effects of the recess on Saturday. The committee would therefore recommend that the afternoon of Wednesday be no longer allowed as a holiday. Holidays: Every Saturday afternoon, election week, Commencement week, the week including Thanksgiving, the week including the annual meeting of the American Institute of Instruction, Christmas Day, Fast Day, the first Monday of June, the Seventeenth of June, the Fourth of July, and the day next after the semi-annual visitations. The committee are aware that considerable abridgment is made of the time heretofore granted to the teachers, but when they consider that but six hours service is required of them daily in School, and that by this arrangement they would still have more than nine weeks annually which might be devoted to relaxation and exercise, they cannot believe that the health of teachers or scholars would be hazarded by too
into the hands of Nathan Tufts, about 1860, there were many varieties, forty, between the gate and the front door. These were thinned out in after years, and others were planted in various parts of the grounds by Mr. Tufts. The horse-chestnut in the circle in the driveway was planted in 1844 in East Somerville, and transplanted here about 1860. The tulip tree, a gift of John K. Hall, was also removed a little later. A remark made by Mr. Hall that it would always be in blossom the Seventeenth of June was never forgotten. The larch trees, now so straight and tall, illustrate an old proverb, amended, As the twig is un-bent, the tree is inclined, for one of them was tied to a broomstick when small to make it straight. The apple trees in the lower garden were moved from the grounds of N. E. Fitz on Winter Hill. Old apple trees a few steps up Summer street challenge inquiry. One of them, on what was once the Thomas Brackett place, was brought there, a good-sized tree, in 1852-3 o
hen the Schools may be closed at sunset. Instructors are to be in their rooms and to ring the bell ten minutes before the time of opening school. After the school is opened, no scholar shall be admitted without written excuse from his parent or guardian. Each school is divided into four classes, sub-divisions to be left to the teacher. The holidays shall be Wednesday and Saturday afternoons; Election Day in January; Fast Day and the day after examinations in April; Monday, June 1, and June 17; July 4; in August, the time of meeting of the American Institute of Instruction and the day bf Commencement at Harvard; the day after examinations in October; Thanksgiving Day; Christmas Day. These rules are to, be enforced in the schools outside the Neck so far as is advisable. This year, also, changes were made in the curriculum, and the following list was authorized and approved:— Fourth class, primary, alphabetical charts, words of two syllables. Third class, Introduction to th
Only one remains to-day, standing by the sidewalk. A Revolutionary elm stood at the corner of Broadway and Cross street until 1860, when it was cut down. Two tulip trees are remembered growing on the Runey estate on Cross street. As tulip trees are slow in coming to their maturity, they must have been of great age. Willows are remembered growing on Broadway, about opposite Walnut street, long before the land was made into a park. The present trees date front 1876, when, on the seventeenth of June, the park was dedicated and formally opened to the public. Many citizens, at the invitation of the city government, presented trees, which were set out and marked with the names of the donors. Only a very few of the names can be ascertained, as there was no official record kept, or if it was kept, it has been lost. Ex-Mayor Furber set out four for himself and family; ex-Mayor Brastow, Zadoc Bowman, N. E. Fitz, Aaron Sargent, and John C. Magoun each set out one. Jacob Glines set ou
Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907, Charlestown schools after 1825 (Continued.) (search)
reported May 11 that Mr. Charles Adams will give to the town a piece of land 30x40 feet, on condition that a school be built forthwith. This report was accepted, and it was voted to build a house in all respects like one recently built on Elm street, the cost, with fences and outhouses, not to exceed the amount appropriated by the town ($500). Vacation this year is to be the same as last year the first week in June and from the 17th to the 29 August, inclusive,— and the following days, 17 June, 4 July, Thanksgiving Day, with the Friday and Saturday following, Christmas Day; and no other days to be allowed except by special vote of the town. The number of children in town June 29, 1840, between four and sixteen years is 2,619, the census being taken by the assessors, James K. Frothingham, William H. Bacon, Fitch Cutter. Voted September 29, that teachers must be residents of the town during their term of service. Charles Kimball, of the Harvard (female) school, resigned the