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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 479 479 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 34 34 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 24 24 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 23 23 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 17 17 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 21, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 12 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 12 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 10 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). You can also browse the collection for June 18th or search for June 18th in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Chapter 22: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862 Including events to June 18, of the Cumberland Gap Campaign, East Tennessee
. Morgan, U. S. Army, commanding Seventh Division, Army of the Ohio. No. 3.-Capt. Jacob T. Foster, First Wisconsin Battery, Chief of Artillery of operations June 6-18. No. 4.-Brig. Gen. Samuel P. Carter, U. S. Army, commanding Twenty-fourth Brigade, Army of the Ohio, of operations June 8-16. No. 5.-Brig. Gen. James G. Spears, Uthe Ohio, of operations June 10-15. No. 6.-Col. John F. De Courcy, Sixteenth Ohio Infantry, commanding Twenty-sixth Brigade, Army of the Ohio, of operations June 7-18. No. 7.-Brig. Gen. Absalom Baird, U. S. Army, commanding Twenty-seventh Brigade, Army of the Ohio, of operations June 7-18. No. 8.-Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, C. S.18. No. 8.-Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, C. S. Army, including orders for movement of troops. No. 9.-J. F. Belton, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, C. S. Army. No. 1.-report of Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell, U. S. Army, with dispatches relating to Brigadier-General Morgan's report. headquarters Army of the Ohio, July 15, 1862. General Morgan has had very great di
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 7-12, 1862.--raid on Confederate line of communications between Chattanooga, Tenn., and Marietta, Ga. (search)
bout or visited any of their camps, obtaining or seeking information, they could not be convicted. Soon thereafter all the prisoners were removed to Atlanta, Ga., and they left Knoxville under a belief that their comrades, who had been tried, either had been or would be acquitted. In the mean time, however, the views entertained and expressed to them by the members of the court were overcome, it may be safely assumed, under the prompting of the remorseless despotism at Richmond. On June 18, after their arrival at Atlanta, where they rejoined the comrades from whom they had been separated at Chattanooga, their prison door was opened and the death sentences of the seven who had been tried at Knoxville were read to them. No time for preparation was allowed them. They were told to bid their friends farewell, and to be quick about it. They were at once tied and carried out to exe. cution. Among the seven was Private Samuel Robinson, Company G, Thirty-third Ohio Volunteers, who