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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 479 479 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 34 34 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 24 24 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 23 23 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 17 17 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 21, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 12 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 10 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for June 18th or search for June 18th in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Drewry's Bluff. (search)
eneral Whiting's movement, I insisted as a part of my order to him, that he w'd obey no orders, from any source not passing through me. Such, General, are my recollections (distinct) of those events—which you will find in the No's. of the Land We Love, or Baltimore Southern Magazine in which they were published a few years since, numbers of which I sent you at the time. I regret that I have not a copy of Ransom's subterfuge in defence of Bragg or I w'd send it to you with pleasure, but you will probably find it in the back files of the Richard Whig, in which, I think, it was published, shortly after the Battle of Drury's bluff. With my kind regards to your family, & hoping that you may furnish Mr. Marrin with your recollections of that eventful period of our late war, I remain, Sincerely y'r friend G. T. Beauregard. General H A. Wise, Richard, Va. P. S.—The events of the 15th, 16th, 17th & 18th of June, ‘64, about Petersburg were also critical & glorious. G.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
salient became nearer the Federal lines. Beyond Colquitt's salient to the east the lines ran to the salient, variously called Pegram's (who occupied it on the 18th of June), Elliott's (who there fought the mine fight in August) and Gracie's (who held it after the mine fight). None of these, however, were engaged on the 18th of Ju18th of June. The attack of the Federals commenced on the 16th. From the Virginia battery, on the banks of the Appomattox, to the Colquitt salient, the Confederate lines were there held by General Wise's Virginia brigade and the Virginia reserves. The Federals came across the James river and advanced on Petersburg by the Charles City rld. The balls passed over me from both sides, so I was unhurt, but I felt very uncomfortable all night in my wet and muddy clothing. The next morning was the 18th June. Then Mr. Alley says, Lincoln's pets, 1,950 strong, the Maine battery, charged us, and went back with 250. I can realize that this was so, for, except at Cold
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
the cheering of the Confederate army, a stampede was begun, which led to a general rout. The third army corps under General Early (Hill being unwell), left the position at the Wilderness, May 8, 1864, and engaged in the great battles of Spotsylvania Court House when the 38th lost several brave men. The regiment was in the attack made by General Hill on General Warren, at Noel's station, May 23d, and the skirmishing at Riddle's shop, June 13th, and on down to Petersburg which was reached June 18th. The following is a resolution of the Confederate Congress, May 17, 1864: The Congress of the Confederate States of America do resolve, That the thanks of Congress are eminently due, and are hereby tendered to the 34th and 38 Regiments of North Carolina Troops, for the promptness and unanimity with which they have re-enlisted for the war. Colonel Hoke, from wounds received in battle, was disabled for field service, and was appointed for the post at Charlotte. Lieutenant-Colon