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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 378 378 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 28 28 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 21 21 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 27, 1861., [Electronic resource] 15 15 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 13 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 9 9 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for June 23rd or search for June 23rd in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
eligious Intelligencer, are out upon certain articles of yours in the Liberator. They are out in a double sense—out in their columns and out of their minds. Except for the hospitality given to these obnoxious sentiments of Henry C. Wright's, and the author's Lib. 7.85, 95. defence of them (embracing the un-Darwinian dictum, Man can never originate a moral obligation), the readers of the Liberator had little intimation of the editor's speculations on human government until the issue of June 23, or the week following his retirement to Lib. 7.103. Brooklyn, where his thoughts regained their freedom. A correspondent, in a brief essay on that subject, had argued Lib. 7.102. scripturally that we have no political or moral right to sit in judgment over laws already made, and Christians must obey magistrates, not only for truth's but for consciencea sake. At some length, Mr. Garrison contended that human governments are the results of human disobedience to the requirements of heave
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
en place in the Convention, their minds were quickly made up. At our lodgings, wrote Mrs. Mott in her diary Life, p. 156. under the above date, met Wm. L. Garrison and party, with joy and sorrow too. They had resolved not to enter the Convention whence we were excluded. We reasoned with them on the subject, but found them fixed. One reason for this decision was the lateness of their arrival. By Mr. Garrison's account: The Convention had but three days more to sit, It adjourned June 23. and Lib. 10.139. therefore we would not disturb it by renewing the agitation of the subject already decided, but so decided as to prevent us also from entering without renewing its discussion. Another reason was, that, after having called every friend of the oppressed from all parts of the globe, the Convention was not an open one, but resolved itself into a delegated body. Another was, that, being a delegated body, the delegates were not all received. Why, which of the delegates had