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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 345 345 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 22 22 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 13 13 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 27, 1861., [Electronic resource] 11 11 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 9 9 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 9 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 8 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A.. You can also browse the collection for June 24th or search for June 24th in all documents.

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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 8: battles around Richmond. (search)
ampaign in the valley of the Shenandoah, by which he had baffled and rendered useless large bodies of the enemy's troops, and prevented McDowell from being sent to the support of McClellan with his force of 40,000 men) had been ordered to move rapidly toward Richmond for the purpose of uniting in an attack on McClellan's lines. The following correspondence shows how much the Federal authorities, civil and military, were befogged by Jackson's movements. headquarters, army of the Potomac, June 24, 12 P. M., 1862. A very peculiar case of desertion has just occurred from the army. The party states he left Jackson, Whiting, and Ewell, fifteen brigades (a) at Gordonsville, on the 21st; that they were moving to Frederick's Hall, and that it was intended to attack my rear on the 28th. I would be glad to learn, at your earliest convenience, the most exact information you have as to the position and movements of Jackson, as well as the sources from which your information is derived, th