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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 345 345 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 22 22 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 13 13 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 27, 1861., [Electronic resource] 11 11 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 9 9 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 8 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for June 24th or search for June 24th in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
g back to the Valley, and then across it and into the Alleghany mountains. His instructions were to destroy Hunter if possible, and to threaten Maryland and Washington city by an advance northward, if the way should be open. Hunter was now out of reach, and his flight left the road to the Potomac open. Early, determined to seize the opportunity and try to relieve the pressure on Lee by a rapid advance to the Potomac and demonstrations against Washington and Baltimore. Leaving Salem on June 24, Early marched rapidly to the Potomac, a distance of 212 miles, by July 4th, driving Sigel's forces from Martinsburg and other points, to take refuge on the Maryland Heights. Mr. Pond praises Sigel for remaining there with 6,000 or 8,000 men when he should have joined Wallace's troops advancing from Baltimore. Early finding he could not get at Siegel, marched round him, and on July 9th, entered Frederick; on the same day he attacked Wallace, who, with some garrison troops and Rickett's div
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
g back to the Valley, and then across it and into the Alleghany mountains. His instructions were to destroy Hunter if possible, and to threaten Maryland and Washington city by an advance northward, if the way should be open. Hunter was now out of reach, and his flight left the road to the Potomac open. Early, determined to seize the opportunity and try to relieve the pressure on Lee by a rapid advance to the Potomac and demonstrations against Washington and Baltimore. Leaving Salem on June 24, Early marched rapidly to the Potomac, a distance of 212 miles, by July 4th, driving Sigel's forces from Martinsburg and other points, to take refuge on the Maryland Heights. Mr. Pond praises Sigel for remaining there with 6,000 or 8,000 men when he should have joined Wallace's troops advancing from Baltimore. Early finding he could not get at Siegel, marched round him, and on July 9th, entered Frederick; on the same day he attacked Wallace, who, with some garrison troops and Rickett's div
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
is groping around to ascertain the whereabouts of his adversary, the next scence unfolds: General Early has planned and executed a flank march around Winchester, worthy of Stonewall Jackson,—the men of his division are mounting the parapets on June 14th, and capturing Milroy's guns. General Edward Johnston's division is pursuing Milroy's fugitives down the Valley pike. General Rodes has captured Martinsburg with 100 prisoners, and five cannon,—Ewell's corps is master of the Valley,—and by June 24th, the Army of Northern Virginia is in Pennsylvania, while for the third time the Army of the Potomac is glad if it can interpose to prevent the fall of Washington—and a sixth commander has come to its head—General George C. Meade. Then follows the boldest and grandest assault of modern war— the charge upon the Federal centre entrenched on the heights of Gettysburg—a charge that well-nigh ended the war with a clap of thunder, and was so characterized by brave design and dauntless
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 78 (search)
different times, so as to use the same force in turn against Rosecrans and Grant, his cherished military maxim, not to risk two great decisive battles at the same time, was not applicable—and at the same time warning him of the other and more truthful military maxim, councils never fight. To these persuasive arguments, accompanied with the assurance of the constantly growing complaint and dissatisfaction, not only in Washington, but throughout the country, Rosecrans yielded, and on the 24th of June, commenced a series of movements with the view of creating the impression of a main advance on our center and left, in the direction of Shelbyville, whilst he would strike the decisive blow by a rapid march, in force, upon our right, and after defeating or turning it, to move on Tullahoma, and thereby seize upon our base and line of communication from that point. In furtherance of that design he moved upon and took possession of Liberty and Hoover's Gaps, which gave to him a commanding