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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 450 450 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 39 39 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 35 35 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 14 14 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 14 14 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 11 11 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for June 25th or search for June 25th in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 6 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
dollars were appropriated to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of five men who would enlist in the military service for three years, to fill the quota of the town. August 18th, Voted, to pay a bounty of fifty dollars to each volunteer who enlists for nine months and is credited to the town; and to pay to any man five dollars who procures a volunteer that is accepted. 1863. No action appears to have been necessary by the town during this year to keep its quota filled. 1864. June 25th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years military service, and be accepted and credited to the town. This bounty was continued to be paid until the end of the war. Clarksburg furnished forty-two men for the war, which was a surplus of two over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid to so
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
urer was authorized to borrow five hundred dollars for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. 1864. April 2d, Voted, to raise two thousand dollars to refund to citizens money which they had subscribed and paid to aid recruiting and to fill the quotas of the town. The assessors were directed to assess a tax for that purpose. The treasurer was authorized to borrow eight hundred dollars to complete the quota of the town under the last call of the President for more men. June 25th, The bounty to each volunteer who should enlist for three years, and be credited to the quota of the town, was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. The treasurer was authorized to borrow, not exceeding twenty-five hundred dollars, to pay the same. August 3d, Voted, to borrow an additional sum of twenty-five hundred dollars for the payment of bounties. 1865. At a special meeting held on the 19th of June, the town voted to refund the money which had been contributed by individua
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
vor to procure three-years men to fill its quota. 1863. August 17th, Voted, that the selectmen be authorized to hire money to pay aid to the families of drafted men. 1864. April 8th, The treasurer, under the direction of the selectmen, was authorized to borrow money sufficient to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three years service, as will enlist to the credit of the town under the pending call of the President for two hundred thousand men. June 25th, The same officers were authorized to borrow money and pay the same bounty for volunteers in anticipation of another call for more men by the President. August 13th, A citizens' meeting was held: a committee was appointed to circulate a subscription paper to raise a fund for the payment of bounties to volunteers, in addition to the one hundred and twenty-five dollars voted by the town. An adjourned meeting was held August 15th. The committee reported that thirteen hundred and sixty-four
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
ollars to aid the families of soldiers; also, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to soldiers who have enlisted, or may enlist, to fill the quota of the town. April 20th, Fifteen hundred dollars were voted to pay bounties. June 25th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who may enlist, in anticipation of any call for men by the President, on condition that individuals will subscribe a sufficient sum to pay the balance. August 9th tax be assessed upon the inhabitants. 1864. April 16th, Two thousand dollars were appropriated to enable the selectmen to enlist volunteers to fill the quota of the town, and seven hundred and one dollars for bounty money advanced by them. June 25th, Four thousand dollars were appropriated to procure volunteers to fill the quota of the town in anticipation of any call of the President for more men. November 8th, The town bounty was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so conti
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
duty, and in case of their decease the said extra pay is to be paid to their heirs. 1862. August 5th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town for three years service. September 1st, Voted, to pay the same bounty to men enlisting for nine months and credited to the quota of the town. 1863. There does not appear to have been any action taken by the town in its corporate capacity during this year in regard to the war. 1864. June 25th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist to the credit of the town for three years previous to March, 1865. Plympton furnished ninety-six men for the war, which was a surplus of eight over and above all demands. Seven were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town for military purposes, exclusive of State aid, was six thousand four hundred and ninety-one dollars and eighty-five cents
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
26th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow thirty-one hundred dollars to pay bounties to volunteers who shall enlist to the credit of the town for three years service. August 23d, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer for nine months service. 1863. No special action appears to have been taken by the town during this year in regard to the war, although recruiting volunteers and the payment of State aid were continued. 1864. June 25th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred aud twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who should enlist to fill the quota of the town for the next call for men. On the 14th of August it was decided to pay the bounty in gold, and to raise a sufficient sum of money to procure fourteen men for the army. West Brookfield furnished one hundred and fifty-nine men for the war, which was a surplus of twelve over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. The who