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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 450 450 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 39 39 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 35 35 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 14 14 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 14 14 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 11 11 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for June 25th or search for June 25th in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
s but too readily acquiesced in; and the desire to spare the army a fearful sacrifice of life having made, such an alternative appear probable, everybody felt disposed to wait patiently for this issue. A movement, however, took place on the 25th of June which, although of no great importance, interrupted at last this long inaction. In order to make himself master of the approaches to the plateau of Old Tavern, McClellan, still manoeuvring as if conducting the operation of a siege, became des importance in view of the great operations which were in preparation, and which it could no longer prevent. When McClellan decided at last to feel the enemy with his left, a terrible storm was gathering on his right. On that very day, the 25th of June, a single horseman, without companions and without followers, had ridden through the deserted streets of Richmond at an early hour in the morning, had dismounted at Lee's headquarters, and had shortly after quickly resumed his journey in the d
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Kentucky (search)
us of the railroad through which he obtained his supplies was at Rolla, in Missouri, and thence all the transportation was effected by means of wagons. We have related how, on the 6th of June, after the capture of Corinth, the naval battle at Memphis delivered to the Federals the whole course of the Mississippi as far as Vicksburg. A few days after, several Federal gun-boats entered the Arkansas and proceeded up White River. Curtis, on being apprised of their movement, started on the 25th of June for Jacksonport to meet them. The waters in the river were so low that it would be impossible for the vessels to proceed beyond this town. Curtis reached the place on the same day with his vanguard, where he joined General Washburne, who had arrived with a regiment of cavalry from Springfield, in Missouri, without having encountered a single enemy. But the gun-boats failed to make their appearance. As we have said in a previous chapter, they had found the Confederates entrenched insi