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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 256 256 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 51 51 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 31 31 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 19 19 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 10 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 9 9 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for June 26th or search for June 26th in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
Her captain complied, but was enraged to find himself thus entrapped. He declared the war was over. Waddell demanded documentary evidence which the Captain could not produce. His vessel was seized, and the Shenandoah started after the companion ships with the usual result. For several days following, the Shenandoah had things her own way, and the prizes were frequent and valuable. She struck fleet after fleet of whaling ships, only to consign them and their contents to the flames. On June 26th alone, five ships, valued collectively at $160,000, were destroyed, and a day or two later, she reached the climax of her career, burning within eleven hours eleven ships, worth in the aggregate nearly $500,000. The Shenandoah was now overcrowded with prisoners, most of whom were afterwards transferred to passing ships. Having cruised around daringly for a week or two longer, and sighting no more ships, she turned her prow southward again. Her depredations were at an end, for early in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
ston having been badly wounded at Seven Pines, General Robert E. Lee was now in command. After Seven Pines, the boys went into camp near Richmond, and here several weeks were passed in drilling. The Federal line of battle stretched along the Chickahominy a distance of nine miles, the right wing resting upon the northern bank of the stream, and extending a short distance above the village of Mechanicsville, six miles from Richmond. The fighting at Mechanicsville, on the evening of the 26th of June, opened the ball that resulted in the demoralization of McClellan's forces, and his rapid retreat to the shelter of his gun boats in James river. According to General Lee's plan of attack, Jackson threw his force upon the right flank of the enemy, whilst A. P. and D. H. Hill pressed them vigorously at other points. Their breastworks were soon carried, and the enemy fell back one mile to a stronger line of works, from which position A. P. Hill failed to dislodge them. Night came on, but
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
ty along the Chickahominy. On the 14th of June the 38th was transferred to General Wm. D. Pender's Brigade, composed of the 38th North Carolina, Colonel W. J. Hoke; 34th North Carolina, Colonel R. H. Riddick; 22nd North Carolina, Colonel James Conner; 16th North Carolina, Colonel McElroy. The 13th North Carolina, Colonel A. M. Scales, was attached in the winter. Pender's Brigade formed the 6th of the Light Division commanded by General A. P. Hill. The division crossed Meadow bridge June 26th, and it was seen from scattered portfolios and other luxuries, to which the Southern soldier was a stranger, that the Yankee picket at that place had fled with great precipitation. As soon as the Thirty-eighth had got a little beyond Mechanicsville it was saluted with heavy shelling. A line of battle was formed and the march continued until the order was given to charge the battery that was throwing the deadly missiles. The heat was intense and the double quick march exhausting, but the