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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 256 256 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 51 51 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 31 31 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 19 19 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 10 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 9 9 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for June 26th or search for June 26th in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
nstantly provoking skirmishes, sometimes at one point, sometimes at another, he finally succeeded in his design. The Federal spies, the fugitive negroes and deserters, all aided him, through their exaggeration, in deceiving McClellan. On the 26th of June the latter believed that the arrival of Jackson would swell Lee's forces to one hundred and sixty thousand men, and that the fortifications around Richmond were bristling with two hundred guns of heavy calibre. The army he was about to face, ith his adversaries; this army, therefore, had undergone a diminution of twenty-five thousand men. See the tabular figures of effective strength in Note B, Appendix to this volume. This was more than one-fourth of its effective force on the 26th of June. An interlude was to follow this great struggle. While McClellan was fortifying himself at Harrison's Landing, Lee, hampered like himself by the difficulty of subsisting his army, was obliged to fall back as far as the environs of Richmond
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
ed in attempting to direct the complicated movements of several armies from Washington; but instead of securing unity of direction by restoring General McClellan to supreme authority over all the troops destined to operate against Richmond, he summoned General Pope from the West, and placed the corps of McDowell, Banks and Fremont under his command. The latter, refusing to serve under an officer who was his inferior in rank, transferred the command of his troops to Sigel. It was now the 26th of June, the day of the battle of Mechanicsville. Shortly after, Mr. Lincoln revived the rank of commander-in-chief of all the Federal armies, of which he had stripped McClellan just as he was taking the field; but not wishing to reinstate that general, he conferred the office upon Halleck. The brilliant successes of the armies of the West had won the admiration of all men; these successes were supposed to be due to the superiority of those armies over Eastern troops, and in taking their genera
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
battles to the first figure, and five thousand crippled or sick incapacitated for active service after a week of forced marches, we still find the figure of ninety-four thousand men as the actual effective force of the Confederate army on the 26th of June. According to detailed accounts, the following are the losses of this army by divisions from the 26th of June to the 1st of July: Longstreet, 4429; A. P. Hill, 3870; Ewell, 987; Whiting, 1081; D. H. Hill, 3955; Magruder, about 1000; Jone26th of June to the 1st of July: Longstreet, 4429; A. P. Hill, 3870; Ewell, 987; Whiting, 1081; D. H. Hill, 3955; Magruder, about 1000; Jones, 832; McLaws, 300; Huger, 1612; Artillery, 44. Total, 18,961, of which number the prisoners amounted to scarcely 900. The losses of Stuart's and Jackson's divisions are not given in this estimate. As the latter had been very much engaged, the aggregate amount of these losses may be estimated at 20,000 men. Note C, page 251. Reports of the Federal and Confederate armies, to explain the third book. I. Report of the Federal armies in Virginia On the 15th of August, 1862. Army