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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 635 635 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 63 63 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 59 59 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 36 36 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 22 22 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 18 18 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 15 15 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 11 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for June 27th or search for June 27th in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
r. Bates's, where were many distinguished people. Among them were Lord Wensleydale, Henry Labouchere (afterwards Lord Taunton), and the Russian Minister. June 26. Visited the Athenaeum Club, where I have been made a pro tem. member; visited the House of Commons; breakfasted in the morning with the Duke of Argyll, where I met Lord Aberdeen; dined with Lord Granville, where I met Lord Clarendon and enjoyed him much, for he seemed a good man; then to a great party at Lansdowne House. June 27. Went down the Thames to the Tower; saw its curiosities; stopped at the Herald College and St. Paul's; lunched at the Mitre in the seat of Dr. Johnson; dined at Mr. Senior's, where were Lord and Lady Monteagle, Mr. and Mrs. Reeve, M. Merimiee, M. de Lesseps. June 28. Went for morning service to the old Temple Church; called on Mr. Grote; sat some time with Mr. Parkes; dined at Sir Henry Holland's. June 29. Breakfast with Roebuck; Parliament, where in Commons I heard Disraeli,—in Lords
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
licted on any being,—man or animal. New York Tribune, March 18, 1874. In a note to Sumner, July 1, the doctor said:— I write a line to give you a kind of moral compensation to your excessive physical suffering. I am perfectly sure that the greater is the pain you have suffered, and the pain you have yet to suffer, the greater also is your chance of being cured. Bear this idea in your mind, and the wakefulness of your nights will be less dreadful. Sumner wrote to Longfellow, June 27:— Little did I think when I last wrote you that fire would be my destiny. It has been applied six times to my neck and spine; to-morrow again. The torment is great; and then the succession of blisters, inflammations, and smarts. . . . I struggle for health, and do everything simply to that end. The doctor is clear that without this cruel treatment I should have been a permanent invalid, always subject to a sudden and serious relapse. Surely this life is held sometimes on hard condi<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
perhaps drive them to unite their distracted voters or to resist the government in case of Republican success. Some who doubted the policy of the speech admitted Sumner's right to make it, in view of what he had suffered from the barbarism of slavery,—making a similar apology for a speech in the House by Owen Lovejoy, brother of the abolitionist killed at Alton. John Bigelow of the Evening Post, who was more in sympathy with Sumner's views than his associates Bryant and Godwin, wrote, June 27, that while appreciating the doubt whether such a speech might not inflame the hostility of the enemies of freedom more than the enthusiasm of its friends, he did not think a different treatment of the subject could reasonably be expected from its author. But Sumner had his own view of the historic conflict. To him it was no holiday contest, but a solemn battle between right and wrong, between good and evil, in which the deepest emotions of human nature were marshalled; in which courage, p