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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 635 635 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 63 63 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 59 59 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 36 36 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 22 22 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 18 18 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 15 15 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 11 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for June 27th or search for June 27th in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
omed vigorous health, and on the seventh of May he turned over the command of the army to Colonel Rogers. General Johnston repaired to New Orleans, and consulting eminent physicians, who insisted on absolute rest as the only remedy; and on the 27th of June he wrote to the Secretary of War tendering his resignation, which was declined. In December, his health having sufficiently improved, he returned to Texas. In 1838 Mirabeau B. Lamar was elected President, and David G. Burnet Vice President, . But there was beef on the hoof, the cattle being driven by day and eaten the same night. Many horses and mules died for want of fodder and rest, and not a few wagons were burned for lack of animals to draw them. Hunter reached Gauley Bridge, June 27, with his army in a state of demoralization and exhaustion. Early reached Salem on the 22d. He had moved 209 miles in nine days, had saved Lynchburg and driven Hunter headlong back to the Valley, and then across it and into the Alleghany mo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
g great physical pain, he continued in command of the army, effecting the organization of the army and its thorough discipline, until worn down with fatigue and suffering he was warned by his physicians that rest alone could restore him to his accustomed vigorous health, and on the seventh of May he turned over the command of the army to Colonel Rogers. General Johnston repaired to New Orleans, and consulting eminent physicians, who insisted on absolute rest as the only remedy; and on the 27th of June he wrote to the Secretary of War tendering his resignation, which was declined. In December, his health having sufficiently improved, he returned to Texas. In 1838 Mirabeau B. Lamar was elected President, and David G. Burnet Vice President, and on the 22d of December, after their installation, General Johnston was appointed Secretary of War, a position which he filed with distinguished ability until 1840, when he resigned. After his resignation he repaired to his plantation in Brazoria
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
Castle with the same headlong speed, not through fear of the enemy, but through necessity of reaching supplies. During the week that elapsed before these were obtained, the troops had no hard bread, and only one issue of six ounces of flour per man. But there was beef on the hoof, the cattle being driven by day and eaten the same night. Many horses and mules died for want of fodder and rest, and not a few wagons were burned for lack of animals to draw them. Hunter reached Gauley Bridge, June 27, with his army in a state of demoralization and exhaustion. Early reached Salem on the 22d. He had moved 209 miles in nine days, had saved Lynchburg and driven Hunter headlong back to the Valley, and then across it and into the Alleghany mountains. His instructions were to destroy Hunter if possible, and to threaten Maryland and Washington city by an advance northward, if the way should be open. Hunter was now out of reach, and his flight left the road to the Potomac open. Early, de