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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 635 635 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 63 63 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 59 59 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 36 36 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 22 22 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 18 18 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 15 15 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 11 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for June 27th or search for June 27th in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
oner, might have accomplished important results. But even if it had been entirely free to execute this movement, the configuration of the James would have compelled it to move away from Richmond, to rest upon that part of the river which the navy could reach without danger. This manoeuvre, which had been in preparation by McClellan for several days, would not have assumed the character of a retreat if it had not been undertaken the day after a bloody defeat. But on the evening of the 27th of June it had become a necessity. It alone, in fact, afforded the Federals the means of escaping a serious disaster. A few words, regarding the situation of the two armies, will enable the reader to appreciate the difficult position in which they found themselves, the resources they still possessed for getting out of it, and the rare ability with which General McClellan knew how to use them. The Chickahominy, after running parallel to the James River and the Pamunky, at nearly an equal dist
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the naval war. (search)
eans, Porter's division of mortarboats had returned to Pensacola; he recalled it. All the vessels he could dispose of went up the river, while the transports landed below Vicksburg a small body of troops detached by Butler from the garrison of New Orleans, and placed under the command of General Williams. The difficulty in managing the mortar-boats and the transports, and in obtaining supplies for the fleet, delayed the time when Farragut saw all his forces united below Vicksburg, on the 27th of June. His fleet consisted of five sloops-of-war, the Hartford, bearing the commodore's pennant, the Iroquois, the Oneida, the Richmond and the Brooklyn; six gun-boats, the Kennebeck, the Katahdin, the Wissahickon, the Scioto, the Pinola and the Pinola, forming the first division; six other gun-boats, the Octorara, the Westfield, the Clifton, the Jackson, the Harriet Lane and the Owasco, which, with sixteen mortar-boats, constituted the second division, under David Porter; Williams' division
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VII:—politics. (search)
e him brought into court on habeas corpus. General Cadwalader, who was in command of the fort, refused to obey the summons of the judge to bring the prisoner before his court. The case was taken before Chief-justice Taney, of the Supreme Court of the United States. The latter, who was entirely devoted to the cause of the South, declared that the action of the Baltimore judge was perfectly legal. Mr. Lincoln instructed his agents to pay no attention to this decision. One month later, June 27th, General Banks, who was then in command at Baltimore, caused the arrest of four officers of the municipal police, who, although suspended by him, had persisted in issuing orders to their agents encouraging them to resist the authority of the government. They were taken to Fort Lafayette, near New York, and refused the privilege of the habeas corpus. These arrests, as might have been expected, formed the subject of warm discussions throughout the country. After two days deliberation, the