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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 460 460 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 386 386 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 106 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 39 39 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 32 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 24 24 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 22 22 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 21 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for June 30th or search for June 30th in all documents.

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sistance. During the previous night the Indians, perceiving the hopelessness of resistance, had left their village, and encamped near by under the protection of a white flag. Black Hawk and the other chiefs then came into a council with General Gaines, in which, after claiming that the land could not have been ceded in 1829, because it belonged to an old squaw, whom he called his mother, This title was tribal, not domestic. he declared that he yielded to force. Nevertheless, on the 30th of June they signed a treaty, agreeing to submit to the authority of the United States, and to remain on the west side of the Mississippi. It is almost certain that Black Hawk had been trying for some years to unite the Northwestern Indians in a league against the whites, and that he believed that he had secured the adhesion of nine bands of different tribes; while the Prophet also promised him the aid of the British. When he found himself compelled to submit, through the failure of his alli
nd my children than by this journey? Love and hope cheer me on to discharge a great duty. Kiss our dear children. My most ardent hope is that they may love you and each other. The march was begun from Warner's, June 27th, and a halt made June 30th, at Vallecito. The itinerary at the end of this chapter may be found useful in elucidating the incidents of the journey. General Johnston wrote as follows to his wife, from Vallecito: Vallecito, 180 miles to Yuma, Sunday, June 30, 1861. t I knew I had one, and that was Sidney Johnston. Itinerary. 1861. June 16.Left Los Angeles — to Rancho Chino, thirty-five miles. June 22.Arrived at Warner's Ranch. One hundred miles from Los Angeles. June 27.Left Warner's. To Vallecito. June 30.Left Vallecito. Sunday night. Eighteen miles to Carrizo Wells. Comet seen. July 1.Left Carrizo, 3 P. M. Thirty-seven miles to Indian Wells. July 2.Indian Wells at noon. Twenty-eight miles to Alamo Springs. July 3.Alamo Springs at 8 A. M. Th