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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 460 460 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 386 386 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 106 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 39 39 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 32 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 24 24 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 22 22 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 21 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for June 30th or search for June 30th in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Meade at Gettysburg. (search)
e the commanding general to assume the offensive from his present positions. Not many hours after, new developments did cause him to change his plans, but these instructions evince that foresight which proves his (Meade's) ability to command an army. In similar circumstances, the agreement between Wellington and Blucher to concentrate their two armies-nearly double the number of Napoleon-far to the rear, in the vicinity of Waterloo, has been esteemed a proof of their great ability. On June 30th, General Meade had sent General Reynolds, who commanded the left wing of our army, to Gettysburg, with orders to report to him concerning the character of the ground there, at the same time ordering General Humphreys to examine the ground in the vicinity of Emmetsburg. But while thus active in his endeavors to ascertain the nature of the several positions where he could fight Lee, he, at the same time, continued to press forward his army, and concentrate it so that he could with ease move
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
skirmish with the body of the enemy who had occupied a wooded hill on the extreme right of my line. * * * Shortly after the line had been formed, I received notice that Lieutenant General Longstreet would occupy the ground on my right, and that his line would be in a direction nearly at right angles with mine, and that he would assault the extreme left of the enemy and drive him toward Gettysburg. From a narrative of General McLaws, published in 1873, I copy the following: On the 30th of June, I had been directed to have my division in readiness to follow General Ewell's Corps. Marching toward Gettysburg, which it was intimated we would have passed by ten o'clock the next day (the 1st of July), my division was accordingly marched from its camp and lined along the road in the order of march by eight o'clock the 1st of July. When the troops of Ewell's Corps (it was Johnson's Division in charge of Ewell's wagon trains, which were coming from Carlisle by the road west of the mou
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The campaign of Gettysburg. (search)
h of the army was too much to the east for a rapid concentration on Gettysburg, and believing that General Lee understood the advantages of that position as well as I did, I was determined to occupy it first. I, therefore, ordered Buford, with the first division of cavalry, to move from Middletown by the way of Emmettsburg to Gettysburg, and to hold that position at all hazards until the army could support him. In obedience to these orders, Buford arrived at Gettysburg on the afternoon of June 30th, and obtaining information that Lee was in force on the Cashtown road, he moved out on that road some four miles beyond Gettysburg, and encamped for the night. Early next morning General A. P. Hill attacked him in force, but the nature of the ground was such that Buford, with his splendid fighting, restrained the superior force against him until Reynolds and Howard and others came up, and saved the position to the Army of the Potomac. General Longstreet states that this rencontre was tota
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The mistakes of Gettysburg. (search)
ative closely, he must have discovered that (page 365) he says: General Lee's aggregate force present for duty on the 31st of May, 1863, was sixty-eight thousand three hundred and fifty-two. These are the precise figures that he gives, on page 310, as the aggregate of the infantry alone. My information upon this subject was taken from General Lee's own lips. He estimated his force to be, including the detachments that would join him on the march, a trifle over seventy thousand. On the 30th of June, or the 1st of July, he estimated his infantry at fifty-two thousand bayonets. If Mr. Swinton received any information from me on the subject, he received this, for it was all that I had. Since I have read the report of the Adjutant General of the Army of Northern Virginia, lately published, I am inclined to believe that General Lee included in his estimate two brigades of Pickett's Division (Jenkins' and Corse's) which were left in Virginia, or some other detachments made during the mar
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First cavalry. (search)
e number of men who were able and willing to find their own horses and equipments, notwithstanding that the government had offered to pay the troopers forty cents per day for their use and risk; with the proviso, however, that, in case the trooper lost his horse in any way, he must furnish another, or serve on foot. This proviso was the straw that broke the camel's back. After three months spent in drilling, and in unavailing efforts to fill up, Captain Wister's troop disbanded, on the 30th of June, and its members sought service in other commands. In the meantime, Colonel Schurz had gone to New York, and had succeeded in raising four companies of Germans who had seen service in the cavalry of Europe. And here, also, he was joined by six companies of Americans, which had been organized in hopes of being accepted by the government. A company from Michigan also joined him, which, with Boyd's Philadelphia company, completed the regiment. About this time Colonel Schurz was appoin