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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 460 460 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 386 386 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 106 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 39 39 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 32 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 24 24 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 22 22 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 21 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for June 30th or search for June 30th in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

trements, which belonged to men who were lost. Of dead, wounded and missing, there were seven thousand or upwards. Col. Edmund Pendleton, of a Louisiana regiment, (Col. Pendleton formerly resided in Cincinnati,) who was captured on Monday, (June thirtieth,) assured me that on that day the rebels captured four thousand five hundred prisoners. Our dead he estimated, from examination of the field, at three hundred. Of the wounded there is no account. It is reported that the rebel loss is stillis entire force on the Richmond side of the Chickahominy, he was retreating toward the James River — having stolen a march of twelve hours on Gen. Huger, who had been placed in a position on his flank to watch his movements. The battle of Monday, June 30. By daybreak on Monday morning the pursuit was actively resumed. D. H. Hill. Whiting and Ewell, under command of Jackson, crossed the Chickahominy by the Grapevine bridge, and followed lowed the enemy on their track by the Williamsburgh
nt-General, Lieuts. Lawrence and Candler, Aids-de-Camp, I tender my sincere thanks for their services. Very respectfully, etc., Joseph Hooker, Brig.-General Commanding Division. Official report of Colonel Cowdin. headquarters First Massachusetts volunteers, July 11, 1862. William Schouler, Adjutant-General of Massachusetts: sir: I make to you the following report of the part taken in the battle of Nelson's Farm, near White Oak swamp, by the regiment under my command, Monday, June thirtieth: During the action, I was ordered to charge on the enemy in. front, at considerable distance, which I did, passing over a fence, across a field, and through the woods, the rebels falling back before us. We still advanced through an open field. Here we advanced in line of battle, when a brigade of troops, dressed in our uniforms, and supposed to be our own, opened a terrific fire on our front and left flank, from which fire I lost my bravest and best men. In connection with thi
Rebel reports and narratives. Grenada appeal account. Richmond, July 7. I have been upon the battle-field of the thirtieth of June and first of July, but have no power to describe to you the condition of the country or the evidences presented to the eye of the terrible conflict that raged there. For five miles along the road pursued by the two armies the surface of the earth is strewn with tattered blue coats, knapsacks cut to pieces, broken canteens, empty cartridge-boxes, and dirty military caps. The fences are down; the trees, riven and blasted by the shells of the artillery, impede the way with their fallen branches; the houses are riddled in weather-board and shingle roof; here a broken caisson stands in the middle of the road; there the festering carcass of a dead horse poisons the atmosphere with its exhalations, while on every hand the blighted crops of clover, corn, oats and wheat, tell of the ravages which twenty-four hours of warfare accomplished. Perhaps th
ice,3,000--6,500 Total, 46,858 Note.--Instead of fourteen thousand five hundred men, Banks had only about eight thousand, from his report to me after the battle of Cedar Mountain. (See correspondence on the subject with Gen. Banks.) I certify that this is a true copy of the consolidated morning report of the army of Virginia, dated July thirty-first, 1862, commanded by Major-Gen. Pope. United States military telegraph, War Department, Washington, D. C., June 30, 1862. Middletown, June 30--1.10 P. M. Time received: 1.45 P. M. [Extract.] Major-General John Pope: . . . The troops forming First corps are not in good condition. They are weakened and poorly provided. The organization is not complete, and the whole cavalry force consists of not more than eight hundred (800) effective men and horses. They are scarcely sufficient for picket and patrol duty, so that I can hardly make a reconnoissance. . . (Signed) F. Sigel, Major-General Commanding. A true copy: T. C. H.
ice,3,000--6,500 Total, 46,858 Note.--Instead of fourteen thousand five hundred men, Banks had only about eight thousand, from his report to me after the battle of Cedar Mountain. (See correspondence on the subject with Gen. Banks.) I certify that this is a true copy of the consolidated morning report of the army of Virginia, dated July thirty-first, 1862, commanded by Major-Gen. Pope. United States military telegraph, War Department, Washington, D. C., June 30, 1862. Middletown, June 30--1.10 P. M. Time received: 1.45 P. M. [Extract.] Major-General John Pope: . . . The troops forming First corps are not in good condition. They are weakened and poorly provided. The organization is not complete, and the whole cavalry force consists of not more than eight hundred (800) effective men and horses. They are scarcely sufficient for picket and patrol duty, so that I can hardly make a reconnoissance. . . (Signed) F. Sigel, Major-General Commanding. A true copy: T. C. H.