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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 460 460 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 386 386 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 106 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 39 39 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 32 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 24 24 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 22 22 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 21 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for June 30th or search for June 30th in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 6 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
ly the most enthusiastic, of any one that has been held. It was enlivened by the singing of several patriotic pieces. Full one-third of the audience were ladies, who have manifested a considerable interest in this movement from the start. September 6th, It was resolved, That we have the utmost confidence in the President of the United States, and that we will give him our cordial support in signing the Emancipation and Confiscation Act at as early a day as he may deem expedient. 1864. June 30th, The town voted that all citizens who had enlisted, or might afterwards enlist, who had received a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars, be paid that amount, and to the heirs of those who have died in the service. July 27th, Voted to pay each man in town who has, or who shall, put in a substitute in anticipation of a draft, the sum of one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 1865. At the annual town-meeting held March 6th, it was voted to authorize the selectmen to pay to each volunteer
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
the first Fall-River soldier who has fallen in the present struggle for the maintenance of our liberties, that we attend the funeral of the late Nathaniel S. Gerry, a private of Company A, Seventh Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, in a body. June 30th, A similar vote was passed in regard to the death of Lieutenant Jesse D. Bullock, the first Fall-River officer who had fallen in the war. Lieutenant Bullock belonged to the Seventh Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, and died June 25, 1862, o meeting held on the 17th of September, the tax-collector was instructed to collect to deficiency on the polls of those liable to draft. Other meetings were held during the year, but nothing of special interest was transacted. 1865. On the 30th of June a town-meeting was held, the war being over, at which it was voted to raise money by taxation sufficient to reimburse to citizens the amounts they had advanced to encourage recruiting and fill the quotas of the town. The selectmen of Seekon
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
apacity, during this year, in matters relating to the war, although recruiting went on, and the payment of State aid to the soldiers' families was continued. 1864. On the 18th of April the selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer, or drafted man, for three years service, who shall be mustered into the military service and credited to the quota of the town; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay the same. On the 30th of June the treasurer was authorized to borrow money, not exceeding ten thousand dollars, to be used by the selectmen as they may deem expedient, to encourage enlistments, and to fill the quota of the town upon any call, or calls, made by the President, which hereafter he may issue. Monson, according to a return made by the selectmen in 1866, furnished one hundred and eighty men for the war, which was at least one hundred less than the town actually furnished, as it filled its quota upon every
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
to those citizens who were drafted, and had procured substitutes or had paid commutation, there be paid the sum of three hundred dollars; and for this purpose the selectmen and treasurer were directed to borrow thirty-six hundred dollars. This amount was borrowed on the personal notes of the selectmen and treasurer, on a guarantee to them signed by about three hundred voters of the town; on the 20th of May, 1865, the town assumed the liabilities incurred by the selectmen and treasurer. June 30th, Voted, to raise a sum of money sufficient to procure forty volunteers. 1865. January 2d, Voted to raise twenty-five hundred dollars to procure recruits on the last call of the President for three hundred thousand men. Belchertown furnished two hundred and eighty men for the war, which was a surplus of twenty over and above all demands. Nine were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
rrow money to aid the families of deceased and disabled soldiers, and the families of men who may be drafted. 1864. March 30th, Voted, to raise four thousand seven hundred dollars to refund money paid by private citizens for bounties and to encourage recruiting. The bounty to volunteers for three years service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. August 3d, This amount was directed to be paid to all persons who furnished substitutes to fill the quota of the town. 1865. June 30th, Voted to have a celebration in honor of those who had served in the army and navy, including their families. A committee of twenty was appointed to make arrangements. Abington furnished about ten hundred men for the war, which was a surplus of seventy-one over and above all demands. Forty-four were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was one hundred and five thousand two hundred dollars
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Suffolk County. (search)
amilies was organized as follows: Aldermen Thomas C. Amory, Otis Norcross, Francis Richards, Joseph F. Faul; councilmen Joseph Buckley, William Carpenter, John S. Pear, Sumner Crosby, F. H. Sprague; Charles J. McCarthy, paymaster; Timothy R. Page, relief clerk. June 23d, A vote of thanks was passed to Colonel Thomas Cass and the Ninth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers for a present to the city of Boston of a Rebel flag, taken at the battle of Hanover Court House, Va., on the 27th ultimo. June 30th, A communication was received from Mayor Wightman recommending that a lot in Mount Hope Cemetery be set apart for the burial of soldiers; whereupon it was ordered that the trustees of Mount Hope Cemetery be authorized to select a suitable lot of not less than twelve hundred square feet, to be known as the Soldiers' Grave, to be specially appropriated and set apart for the burial of such persons as may die in the cause of their country in the existing war. July 14th, A communication signed