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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 460 460 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 386 386 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 106 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 39 39 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 32 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 24 24 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 22 22 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 21 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for June 30th or search for June 30th in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
ates. A violent storm came on, but we managed to 'bus it home, taking a cab only at Marble Arch. June 29. To dine with the Greek Minister at eight o'clock, and to the soirge of the Academy. To Chelsea, to call upon Mrs. Oscar Wilde.... He showed me with pride a fine boy of five years. We had some talk of old times, of his visit to America; I reminded him of the vermilion balcony at which he laughed. [Wilde had complained that the usual pronunciation of these words was prosaic.] June 30.... Mrs. Oscar Wilde asks us to take tea on Thursday; she has invited Walter Pater.... Have writ to James Bryce. July 2. To see Oscar Wilde's play, Lady Windermere's Fan, at St. James's Theatre. We went by invitation to his box, where were Lady Wilde and Mrs. Oscar. The play was perfectly acted, and is excellent of its kind, the motif not new, but the denouement original in treatment. After the play to call on Lady Rothschild, then to Constance Flower, Lady Battersea. who showed us
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: in the house of labor 1896-1897; aet. 77-78 (search)
and whether I could have any official support. May 28. Moral Education Association, 10 A. M., Tremont Temple. I wish to record this thought which came to me on my birthday: As for individuals, no bettering of fortunes compares in importance with the bettering of character; so among nations, no extension of territory or aggregation of wealth equals in importance the fact of moral growth. So no national loss is to be deplored in comparison with loss of moral earnestness. Oak Glen, June 30. ...Finished this afternoon my perusal of the Memoir of Mr. John Pickering. Felt myself really uplifted by it into an atmosphere of culture and scholarship, rarely attained even by the intelligent people whom we all know ... July 12. .... I pray this morning for courage to undertake and fervor to accomplish something in behalf of Christian civilization against the tide of barbarism, which threatens to over-sweep it. This may be a magazine article; something, at any rate, which I shall t
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 15: mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord 1908-1910; aet. 89-91 (search)
) She enjoyed all this hugely, but the fatigue was followed by distress so great that the next morning she thought she should die with her door locked. (She would lock her door: no prayers of ours availed against this. In Boston, an elaborate arrangement of keys made it possible for her room to be entered; at Oak Glen there was but the one stout door. On this occasion, after lying helpless and despairing for some time, she managed to unlock the door and call the faithful maid.) On June 30 she writes:-- Oh, beautiful last day of Junel Perhaps my last June on earth.... I shall be thankful to live as long as I can be of comfort or help to any one ... July 12.... Sherman to Corse [Civil War], Can you hold out till I arrive? Corse to Sherman, I have lost an arm, my cheekbone, and am minus one ear, but I can lick all hell yet. July 30. Have felt so much energy to-day that thought I must begin upon my old philosophizing essays.... Could find only Duality of Character. Wh