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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 460 460 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 386 386 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 106 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 39 39 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 32 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 24 24 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 22 22 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 21 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for June 30th or search for June 30th in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gregg's brigade of South Carolinians in the Second. Battle of Manassas. (search)
rength of this brigade is not given in the reports; but in the lists of casualties published in the Mercury the numbers carried into action are given: First South Carolina volunteers (Hagood's), 324; Palmetto sharpshooters, 350; Fifth South Carolina volunteers, 220; Sixth South Carolina volunteers, 356. The numbers of the Second Rifles and Fourth battalion South Carolina volunteers are not given in their list of casualties in this battle; but in the lists of casualties at Frasier's farm, 30th of June, the numbers carried into action are given as, Second Rifles, 275, Fourth battalion, 70. Supposing their strength to have been the same at Manassas, this brigade would have had present 1,589. Evans, 2,200, Reports A. N. V., volume II, page 290. Hampton Legion (estimate) 300, General T. M. Logan. Drayton's brigade, Fifteenth regiment, 415, James's battalion, 160 equals 575. Major H. E. Young, Acting Assistant-General Drayton's brigade, from field returns, September 11, 1862. Of th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official reports of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
h this morning at a later hour than usual, passing through and encamping just beyond the limits of the town. A portion of the 29th was spent in tearing up and burning the railroad track at that place. Leaving this point on the morning of the 30th of June, we entered and moved along the pike leading from Chambersburg to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, encamping at the village of Fayetteville. At 9 P. M. of the same day our regiment and the Seventh South Carolina were ordered off on picket duty at Neoute, we passed through Hagerstown, Greencastle and Chambersburg, and encamped near the latter place for several days, resting our men and horses, and living upon the fat of Pennsylvania. Here, too, we obtained several fresh horses. On the 30th of June we broke camp and started for Gettysburg. We arrived there about ten o'clock A. M., July 2d. After resting about one hour we took up the line of march for the left wing of the enemy. About four o'clock P. M. I was ordered into position with