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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 489 489 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 166 166 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 164 164 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 63 63 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 63 63 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 56 56 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 35 35 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 30 30 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 30 30 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for July or search for July in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, CAMPUS AGRIPPAE (search)
CAMPUS AGRIPPAE a section of the campus Martius laid out as a sort of park by Agrippa, and finished and dedicated by Augustus in 7 B.C. (Cass. Dio lv. 8; Not. Reg. VII; Chron. p. 148). It was a favourite promenade of the Romans (Gell. xiv. 5. 1) extending from about the line of the aqua Virgo on the south at least as far as the present via S. Claudio on the north, and from the via Lata towards the slope of the Quirinal, although its boundaries on the east are uncertain. The PORTICUS VIPSANIA was built on the west side of the campus, along the via Lata. The identification of this campus with the a)/llo pedi/on of Strabo (v. 236) seems inadmissible (cf. Eranos, 1923, 53, where it is further identified with CAMPUS MINOR, the correlative 'maior' being the campus Martius proper, alluded to as circus Flaminius-the name later given to the ninth Augustan region-by Catullus).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, CIRCUS MAXIMUS (search)
ad sedem CCL inter magna opera dicamus). At any rate, our definite information about the monument, whether due to Caesar or Augustus, begins with the Augustan period, and subsequent changes probably did not affect materially its general plan. Besides building the pulvinar, Augustus set up on the spina the obelisk from Heliopolis (Plin. NH xxxvi. 71; Ammian. xvii. 4. 12), which is now in the Piazza del Popolo (see OBELISCUS AUGUSTI). According to Dionysius's description (iii. 68), written in 7 B.C., the circus was then one of the most wonderful monuments in Rome, three and one-half stadia (621 metres) long and four plethra (118 metres) wide, a euripus or water channel, ten feet wide and ten feet deep, surrounding the arena except at the carceres end. The seats rose in three sections, the lower story being built of stone, and the two upper of wood. The short side, opposite the carceres, was crescent-shaped, and the total seating capacity was 150,000. The carceres, or chariot stalls, we
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, CONCORDIA, AEDES, TEMPLUM (search)
aen. ad xvii Kal. Feb., CIL i p. 231, 308; Fast. Verol. ap. NS 1923, 196). In 211 B.C. a statue of Victory on its roof was struck down by lightning (Liv. xxvi. 23. 4). In 121 B.C., after the death of C. Gracchus, the senate ordered this temple to be restored by L. Opimius, to the great disgust of the democracy (App. BC i. 26; Plut. C. Gracch. 17; Cic. pro Sest. 140; August. de civ. d. iii. 25). Opimius probably built his BASILICA (q.v.) at the same time, close to the temple on the north. In 7 B.C. Tiberius undertook to restore the temple with his spoils from Germany (Cass. Dio lv. 8. 2), and the structure was completed and dedicated as aedes Concordiae Augustae, in the name of Tiberius and his dead brother Drusus, on 16th January, 10 A.D. (Ov. Fast. i. 640, 643-648; Cass. Dio lvi. 25; Suet. Tib. 20, where the year is given as 12 A.D.). It is represented on coins (Cohen, Tib. 68-70; BM. Tib. 116, 132-4). A later restoration, perhaps after the fire of 284, is recorded in an inscription
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, CONSUS, AEDES (search)
the Aventine (Fast. Vall. ad xii Kal. Sept.; Amit. ad prid. Id. Dec.), probably vowed or built by L. Papirius Cursor in 272 B.C. on the occasion of his triumph. This may fairly be inferred from the fact that Papirius was painted on the walls in the robes of a triumphator Urlichs, Malerei vor Caesar, 7, 8. (Fest. 209: eius rei argumentum est. . pictum in AEDE VERTUMNI (q.v.) et Consi quarum in altera M. Fulvius Flaccus, in altera T. Papirius Cursor triumphantes ita picti sunt). In the Fasti Vallenses (cf. CIL i 2. p. 240) the day of dedication is given as 21st August; in the Fasti Amiternini (CIL i 2. p. 245) as 12th December; a discrepancy that may perhaps be explained by supposing that the temple had been restored by Augustus after 7 B.C. (CIL i 2. p. 326; WR 167; Aust. de aed. sac. 14, 43). It is probable that this temple was near that of Vortumnus in the VICUS LORETI MAIORIS (q.v.) on the north-west part of the Aventine (HJ 163; Merlin 104, 228; RE iv. 1148 and literature cited).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, DIRIBITORIUM (search)
DIRIBITORIUM a building in the campus Martius in which the votes cast by the people, presumably in the Saepta, were counted by the diribitores, or election officials. It was begun by Agrippa, but opened and finished by Augustus in 7 B.C. (Cass. Dio lv. 8). Its roof had the widest span of any building erected in Rome before 230 A.D., and was supported by beams of larch one hundred feet long and one and a half feet thick, of which one that had not been needed was kept in the Saepta as a curiosity (Cass. Dio, loc. cit.; Plin. NH xvi. 201 ; xxxvi. 102). Caligula placed benches in the Diribitorium and used it instead of the theatre when the sun was particularly hot (Cass. Dio lix. 7), and from its roof Claudius watched a great fire in the Aemiliana (Suet. Claud. 18). Cassius Dio (lxvi. 24) states that this building was burned in the great fire of 80 A.D., but also (lv. 8) that in his day (early third century) it was standing unroofed (a)xanh)s), because, after its wonderful roof of grea
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, MACELLUM LIVIAE (search)
MACELLUM LIVIAE * a market on the Esquiline in Region V (Not. Cur.), built by Augustus and named after his wife, if it is to be identified, as is probable, withto\ teme/nisma to\ *li/ouion w)nomasme/non, which Tiberius dedicated at the beginning of 7 B.C. (Cass. Dio lv. 8). A restoration between 364 and 378 by Valentinian, Valens and Gratian is recorded (CIL vi. 1178), and either this macellum or the MACELLUM MAGNUM (q.v.) is marked on a fragment (4) of the Marble Plan (Atti del Congresso storico 1907, i. 121). In the Chronicle of Benedict of Soracte ad ann. 921 (MGS iii. 715) the aecclesia Sancti Eusebii iuxta macellum parvum is mentioned (HCh 251). In the Liber Pontificalis the church of S. Maria Maggiore was described as iuxta macellum Libiae (LP xxxvii. 8; xlvi. 3; HCh 342), that of S. Vito as in macello (Arm. 81 I; HCh 499), and in the Ordo Benedicti Lib. Cens. Fabre-Duchesne, ii. 153. (p. 141 =Jord. ii. 665) is written: intrans sub arcum (i.e. Gallieni) ubi dicitur macellum
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PORTICUS LIVIAE (search)
PORTICUS LIVIAE begun by Augustus on the site of the house of VEDIUS POLLIO (q.v.) in 15 B.C., and finished and dedicated to Livia in 7 B.C. (Cass. Dio liv. 23; lv. 8; In ib. Ivi. 27. 5 Atovla has been emended into )*iouli/a, as the date there given is 12 A.D.(See BASILICA IULIA, BASILICA AEMILIA.) Suet. Aug. 29; Ov. Fast. vi. 639). It is represented on three fragments of the Marble Plan (10, 11, 109), and was situated on the north slope of the Oppius on the south side of the clivus Suburanus, between this street and the later baths of Trajan. The porticus was rectangular, about 115 metres long and 75 wide, with an outer wall and double row of columns within. In each of the long sides were three niches, the central one square, the others semi-circular. There was also a semi-circular apse on the south side. The entrance was on the north, where a flight of steps, 20 metres wide, led down to the clivus Suburanus. In the centre of the area was something that appears to have been a fou
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, REGIONES QUATTUORDECIM (search)
REGIONES QUATTUORDECIM * the fourteen regions, or wards, into which Augustus divided the city when he reformed the municipal administration in 7 B.C. (Suet. Aug. 30; Cass. Dio Iv. 8). Thereafter Rome was often designated as urbs regionum xiv or urbs sacra regionum xiv (text fig. 4). These regions were divided into vici, and a new set of magistrates, magistri vicorum, drawn from the common citizens, was instituted, originally four from each vicus, but afterwards forty-eight from each region regardless of the number of vici, and two curatores. These magistrates had to do mainly with the religious ceremonies of the regions, while the regular municipal administration was still in the hands of higher officials. (For the administrative organisation of the regions, see Marquardt, Staatsverwaltung iii. 203-207; Mommsen, Staatsrecht ii. 1035- 1037; iii. 119-122; BC 1906, 198-208; CIL vi. 975.) The regions were fourteen in number, twice as many as the traditional hills of Rome, and were k
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, SENACULUM (search)
of the Comitium and in front of the basilica Opimia and area Concordiae (Macrob. i. 8. 2:habet (i.e. templum Saturni) aram et ante senaculum; Fest. 347: unum (senaculum) ubi nunc est acdes Concordiae inter Capitolium ct Forum). The original building For a concrete podium which is attributed to it, see Mem. Am. Acad. v. 58-61; cf. also DR 320, 321. must have been removed when the temple of Concord was enlarged by Opimius in 121 B.C. (HC 6; Thedenat 104; Mitt. 1893, 87, 91) or by Tiberius in 7 B.C. (TF 49). In the passage from Festus just quoted, it is stated, on the authority of a certain Nicostratus of the second century, that there were two other senacula in Rome where the senate was wont to assemble, one ad portam Capenam, the other citra aedem Bellonae. Of these senacula there is no further mention, but the senate met during the year after the battle of Cannae ad portam Capenam (Liv. xxiii. 32), and many such meetings took place in the temple of Bellona whenever foreign ambassador
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
ti, 211. Augustus gives Domus Publica to the Vestals, 58. Horti of Agrippa, 264. Shrine of Vesta of Palatine dedicated, 557. (ca.). Tomb of C. Cestius, 478. 11-4Augustus restores the aqueducts, 13, 20, 21, 23-4, 25. 10Obelisks set up in Campus Martius and in the Circus, 366-7. 9Ara Pacis dedicated, 31. Augustus dedicates pedestal to Vulcan, 583. (after). Arch dedicated to Drusus the Elder, 39. 8Augustus founds the Cohorts of Vigiles, 128. Terminal stones of Tiber banks, 537. 7Rome divided in XIV regions, 444. (after). Augustus restores Temple of Consus, 141. Porticus Liviae dedicated, 423. Diribitorium dedicated by Augustus, 151. Campus Agrippae dedicated by Augustus, go. Tiberius rebuilds Temple of Concord, 139; and removes Basilica Opimia, 81; Augustus builds Atrium Minervae, 57. Macellum Liviae dedicated by Tiberius, 322. Terminal stones of Tiber banks, 537. 5Augustus rebuilds arch of aqueducts over Via Tiburtina, 417. 2Temple of Mars Ultor dedi