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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 489 489 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 166 166 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 164 164 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 63 63 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 63 63 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 56 56 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 35 35 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 30 30 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 30 30 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for July or search for July in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
in command, and killing one and wounding five seamen. I immediately opened tire on the lower town, and set a considerable number of the houses from whence they were firing on us on fire. After bombarding the place for an hour, the mayor unconditionally surrendered the city. I followed the rebel gun-boat Webb to the batteries at Vicksburg, under the guns of which she, with two transports, lay. Heavy ordnance batteries, extending three miles further down the river than during the siege in July, prevented my nearer approach to these boats. Having exchanged some shots, and ascertained that the upper fleet was not in the vicinity of the town, being short of provisions, my battery weakened by the loss of two guns burst, and also short of ammunition, I determined to steam down the river to New Orleans for supplies, and, if possible ascertain the strength of Port Hudson batteries. On the 7th instant, at 4.15, A. M., we were off that place, and, on coming within range, the enemy opened
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 40: (search)
rom the enemy's ranks. Among the latter were workmen who had been employed on board the Merrimac, from whom interesting information was obtained in regard to that and other Confederate vessels. Signal stations were destroyed, their operators captured, and instruments brought away. In these expeditions the gun-boats were constantly exposed to the attacks of Confederate artillery, which was continually on the alert to get a shot at them. So active were the enemy, that, about the middle of July, they constructed a battery mounting 20-pounder Sawyer guns on Malvern Hill, and for a time interrupted the navigation of the James River. The Confederates were, in fact, untiring in their efforts to make the Federal troops and gun-boats uncomfortable. On the 28th of July the enemy commenced the erection of batteries at Four Mile Creek, where they had assembled a large force for the purpose of covering the men at work in the trenches, and making a demonstration against General Foster's fr
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 54: capture of Richmond.--the destruction of the Confederate fleet in the James River, etc. (search)
uld have had an opportunity to strike a blow for the old flag which would tend to make them faithful to it forever. It may, therefore, be considered a misfortune that the French made their exit from Mexico on the first demand of the United States Government, for to have driven them out with a combined army of the blue and the gray would have contributed more to make our country united than all the arts of politicians. We have several days appointed during the year for national observance--July 4th, February 22d, etc.--but there is one day which brought more happiness to the country than any other, which is the day when peace was established between the North and South, and the nation was once more restored to its entirety. There should be a national anniversary established to commemorate the return of peace — the anniversary of the day when General Lee laid down his arms with the determination never to take them up again against the Union, in which he was followed by General Johns
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 56: commerce-destroyers.-their inception, remarkable career, and ending. (search)
n Maffitt only succeeded in destroying three small vessels. He then put into Nassau, where, it will be remembered, the Florida, formerly the Oreto, had been seized by the authorities and her case brought before the courts for violation of the Enlistment Act. The merchant to whom the vessel was consigned swore that the Oreto was a bona fide merchant vessel, while at that very moment her guns and munitions of war were on board another vessel in the harbor. When the ship returned to Nassau in July, under the name of the Florida, her appearance at first caused considerable confusion among the witnesses and officials, for it was evident that a flagrant breach of the British Foreign Enlistment Act had been committed. However, this circumstance did not seriously influence the British authorities at Nassau. Maffitt had entered a bona fide Confederate port, and now that he was again in Nassau, with a regular commission, a good crew, and the Confederate flag at his peak, he received an ov