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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 489 489 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 166 166 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 164 164 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 63 63 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 63 63 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 56 56 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 35 35 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 30 30 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 30 30 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for July or search for July in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 7 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry. (search)
tration for Independence in the American colonies. The centenary of this event was commemorated in this historic house, by proper ceremonies, Sept. 9. 1874. of that town; and one day, when eighteen years of age, he made known, with some emphasis, his purpose to abandon that occupation and to obtain a liberal education. When twenty years old, he joined the Freshman Class of Harvard College. He entered in November, 1774, not being sufficiently qualified in the preparatory studies to enter in July, at the time of the regular examination for admission. It appears by the records of the college on the fourth of that month, that Job Sumner of Milton, having applied for admission to Harvard College, after examination had, voted that upon condition that he pay into the college the sum of £ 6, to comply with the second law of the first chapter of the college laws, he be admitted into the present Freshman Class. His most distinguished classmate was Nathan Dane, who reported in Congress t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 2: Parentage and Family.—the father. (search)
bsences from the State. Mr. Quincy was soon absorbed in politics, as a leader of the Federal party, and severed his active connection with the profession; but he remained the friend of his pupil, notwithstanding their differences in politics, which made sharp divisions in society in those days. Mr. Sumner, in company with Richard Sullivan and Holder Slocum, was proposed as an attorney in the Court of Common Pleas in Boston, at the April Term, 1801 (May 7); and admitted to practice at the July Term (July 11), before Chief Justice Shearjashub Bourne and his associates, William Dennison and Samuel Cooper. His office was at one time on Court Street, at number ten and a half, on the north side; and later at number ninety, according to the numbers of that period. For some time in 1802-3 he was at the South, attending to business which grew out of his father's estate. He remained three months at Savannah, in the early part of 1803, and was present at trials in which John M. Berrien,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 6: Law School.—September, 1831, to December, 1833.—Age, 20-22. (search)
and was in the habit of testing the knowledge of his favorite pupils by close scrutiny and criticism. This was a healthy discipline for one of Sumner's tastes and habits of study, and he profited much by it. Professor Ashmun was succeeded, in July, by Simon Greenleaf, 1783-1853; practised law in Maine, 1806-1833; professor at Cambridge, 1833-1848. the author of the treatise on The Law of Evidence; the vacancy being filled during the intervening period by James C. Alvord, of Greenfield, ane dread his ultima dies. Most persons, I believe, have a vague fear of racking pains and torments that attend dissolution; but these are creatures of the brain. A successor has been appointed to Mr. Ashmun, who will commence his duties here in July, or next September. You have seen him announced in the papers,—Mr. Greenleaf, of Maine; a fine man, learned lawyer, good scholar, ardent student, of high professional character, taking a great interest in his profession: add to this, a gentleman,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 7: study in a law office.—Visit to Washington.—January, 1854, to September, 1834.—Age, 23. (search)
ion of opinions; Replevin of Goods taken in Execution,—Error in the Books, July, 1834, Vol. XII. pp. 104-117. Browne wrote, July 24, Your article on Replevin was learned, and well and logically expressed. It was an extraordinary article for a young man; but it is not practical. You seem to delight in the speculative in the choice of your articles. an elaborate discussion of a technical question; and a caustic notice of Tayler's Law Glossary. July, 1834, Vol. XII. pp. 248-270. To the July number alone he contributed more than one hundred pages. In May, he became one of the editors. His classmate Browne, whose advice he sought in relation to this connection, did not think the effect of habitual writing for law magazines upon a lawyer's mind to be wholesome, and strongly urged that, if he accepted the offer, he should limit his engagement to a year and a half. His studies with Mr. Rand were soon interrupted by a journey to Washington, with an absence from the office from Fe
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
n Edinburgh, and testifying to its richness in ancient manuscripts; Barbour's Equity Digest; July, 18:37, Vol. XVII. pp. 366-372. Phillips on the Law of Patents; Oct, 1837, Vol. XVIII. pp. 1to finish. He wrote or dictated many notes to Sumner, from January till the time of his death in July, the last, with the preface, only four days before that event. After his death, Sumner made the White Mountains, and Portland. At New York he called on Chancellor Kent, In the early part of July the Chancellor had made a visit to Boston, during which Sumner was attentive to him, taking him t you and Dr. Lieber concur in inviting me; but I feel unwilling to pledge myself to do it for the July number. My professional engagements, my own editorial duties, unsupported by a full list of ableortance of its study, through the pages of your journal, as early as the October number if not in July. There are two other subjects which I have at heart, and wish to consider in your journal, if ag
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
I met there M. Bravard, Pierre Claude Jean Baptiste Bravard-Veyrieres, 1804-1861. His specialty was Commercial Law. He served in the Constituent Assembly of 1848, and in the Legislative Assembly of the next year, and rendered service in perfecting measures relating to this branch of jurisprudence. Sumner wrote to Judge Story, April 21: I have spent a long evening with Bravard, Professor of Commercial Law, and successor of Pardessus who vacated his chair at the time of the Revolution of July, being a great Carlist. Bravard says that Boulay-Paty's work is very much superior to that of Pardessus. one of the professors of law,—a man forty years old, with black hair, very agreeable and good-natured. We spoke of jurisprudence in France and America, and of slavery in the latter country; also of several French juridical works. He treated the work of his brother-professor Duranton with great contempt; he said it was good for nothing. He told me that there were upwards of three thous
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 12: Paris.—Society and the courts.—March to May, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
net. Measures emanate from him. With skill that is wonderful, he has reined in the revolution of July. He stands now, with the Republicans pressing on one side and the Legitimists on the other, both man who had deserted republican principles, which he professed ardently before the Revolution of July. March 10. Saw the neat, modern, and beautiful church of Notre Dame de Lorette; entered the ihe; that is, at the extreme of the liberal section. He was the great leader of the Revolution of July. His appearance is prepossessing. One would hardly expect to find in the gentlemanly person wittruction or of the Interior. the Minister for the Interior,—a man celebrated in the Revolution of July,—commenced from the tribune a reply to the attacks which had been made upon the ministry. A scene de la Bastille; saw Napoleon's huge elephant; the foundation for the monument to the victims of July; the Boulevard du Temple; and the house, No. 50, from which Fieschi's infernal machine was direct