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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 489 489 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 166 166 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 164 164 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 63 63 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 63 63 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 56 56 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 35 35 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 30 30 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 30 30 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for July or search for July in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Southern Historical Society Papers. (search)
e charge was probably as splendid as any of which history has made record. Just as we were well over the brow of the hill, I cast my eyes to the right, and I will ever carry a vivid impression of the rapid, but steady and beautiful, movement of the advancing line of some 800 men—the greater part of whom, being to my right, were within the range of my vision—as our five Virginia regiments, their five battle flags, borne by as many gallant color-bearers, floating in the bright sunlight of that July morning, and the battalion of sharpshooters double-quicked across the field they were unconsciously making famous. A Federal soldier thus describes the charge: The second brigade had hardly raised their heads when the cry broke out from our men, The rebels are charging. Here they come. Looking to the front I saw a splendid line of gray coming up the ravine on the run. Their left was nearly up to the bomb-proofs, and their line extended off into the smoke as far as we could see. They w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2 (search)
olestation. This campaign is remarkable for having accomplished more in proportion to the force employed, and for having given less public satisfaction, than any other campaign of the war. The want of appreciation of it is entirely due to the erroneous opinion that the City of Washington should have been taken; but this may be passed over as one of the absurdities of public criticism on the conduct of the war. By glancing at the operations of Early, from the 13th of June to the last of July, it will be seen that in less than two months he had marched over four hundred miles, and with a force not exceeding twelve thousand men, he had not only defeated but entirely dispersed two Federal armies of an aggregate strength of more than double his own; had invaded Maryland, and by his bold and rapid movement upon Washington, had created an important diversion in favor of General Lee in the defence of Richmond, and had re-entered Virginia with a loss of less than three thousand men. Afte
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 25 (search)
id it. They were memorialized and threatened, and the alternative was put to them either to resign or allow the traditional right practice to go on. They quietly answered that neither would be right, and after a while they had no difficulty. During his course, from the date above given, Cadet Polk was a frequent guest at my house, and much beloved in my family; always maintaining a most consistent walk, fervent in spirit, serving the Lord, and beloved among his fellow cadets. He graduated July I, 1827, and was made brevet second lieutenant artillery. But he never entered upon service. He took leave of absence to December 1st of the same year, and then resigned. His health was not strong. He had inherited a tendency to pulmonary disorder, and it was thought that foreign travel would be of service, and he went abroad. I gave him a letter to Olenthus Gregory, whose book on the Evidences, etc., had been so connected with the progress of his mind in divine things. In it I related