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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 489 489 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 166 166 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 164 164 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 63 63 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 63 63 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 56 56 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 35 35 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 30 30 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 30 30 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 5, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for July or search for July in all documents.

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ion, virtually prejudges the whole question at issue between North and South. England led off, in the proclamation, last May, of Queen Victoria, acknowledging the right of "Southern traitors and rebels" to be considered "belligerent." France followed in June, which a declaration of neutrality and an imperial decree against privateering. Prussia, at the same time, took the opportunity of urging the United States to accede to the treaty of the Even the letter of Prince Gortchakoff written in July, is conceded by the Herald to the patronizing this country generally, and in greeting our statement how and when they should bring the civil war to a close." Thus it will be seen that even the Russian manifesto, about which that spavined old rheteacian, Edward Everett, has written one of his protest productions in Bonner's Ledger, is regarded by Lincoln's leading organ in New York, as every intelligent man in the South pronounced it at the time, a vague declaration of friendship for both