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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 489 489 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 166 166 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 164 164 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 63 63 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 63 63 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 56 56 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 35 35 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 30 30 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 30 30 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 9, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for July or search for July in all documents.

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g the fearful cost, and have sacrificed everything on the after of their country; have been for more than a year on, I may say, half rettous, suffering defeat, often and heavy yet with praiseworthy forbearance and fortitude have pushed on with their one and e end in view-- obtain their independence. I do not write this to excuse the rebels — for I believe if ever a rebellion was unnecessary it is this but to show the difference between the sections. When we were defeated at Bull Run, that July, you remember what a sensation it created. You would have thought we were all doomed — stocks down, business dull, but long faces everywhere. Every engagement we are perted--eye, it is demanded — that we be victorious, and unless we are you would think that is the last effort we are capable of making. Oh, that our people had a little moral courage, like foes to beat up against misfortune. In some places, and often, the rebels have shown superior generalship to our own. Every person<
Gen. Builer --At the last accounts Mr. Lincoln was in excellent health. "He is cheerful, " says a letter from lady to the editor of the N. O. D "and cherishes the hops of a ful settlement of our difficulties as early as July. He is contemplating a visit to Boston." We learn from New Orleans that it was understood that Bottler intended to leave for the East. He was sorely perplexed. The labors of his position were wearing him out. He expected to be called as a deliverer by multitudes of "loyal" men. He expected to freight lunumerable ships with cotion, &c., for Yankee and European consumption. He expected a cordial and o able reception. he thought the presence of his agony would lift a burden from the shoulders of an oppressed people eager to live under the stars and stripes, and only walting for the removal of the oppression of a wicked, but small, class of men, who, he supposed, precipitated our people into this war. In all these expectations he has been disapp