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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 489 489 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 166 166 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 164 164 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 63 63 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 63 63 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 56 56 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 35 35 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 30 30 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 30 30 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 2, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for July or search for July in all documents.

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account of these men from McClellan, who is constantly writing that he defeated our army in every battle, in which he himself was beaten into a jelly, we take the liberty of relieving his perplexity. They lost, say, 3,000 men before York. They 5000 at Williamsburg. They lost 2,000 at Bar Hansville. They lost, according to Chandler, 10,000 by digging on the Chickahominy. They lost 13,000 at Seven Pines. The remaining 45,000 they either in the battles of the last of June and 1st of July, from disease or straggling off and perishing in the swamps. Thus we account for the whole eighty thousand, and thus it appears that when we their entire loss in the last- named battles, at between 40,000 and 50,000, we did not miss the mark very far. This loss we believe to be unparallel in the history of any modern besieging army. The French did not sustain the fourth part of it in the siege of the allies did not sustain a greater in the of Sebastopol. When we take these facts in