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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,040 1,040 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 90 90 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 56 56 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 55 55 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 40 40 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 39 39 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 31 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 26 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). You can also browse the collection for July 1st or search for July 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 39 results in 5 document sections:

George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
everything on our part of the line became as unquiet as possible, was the last one written by General Meade until August 12, with the exception of a few lines on July 1 announcing his having been wounded the previous evening. As this period includes what is known as the Seven Days Battles, it becomes necessary, in default of Ged behind the previously selected position at Malvern Hill; during the night the troops, beginning with General Franklin's, had been withdrawn, and by daylight of July 1 were occupying the position where they fought on that day and gained a signal victory. The division of Pennsylvania Reserves, which had fought more and marched mmy to Harrison's Landing. This movement was successfully accomplished during the 2d and 3d of July. The total loss in General McClellan's army from June 26 to July 1, inclusive, was 15,249. The Seven Days Battles, June 26 to July 1, 1862. Of this number the Pennsylvania Reserves lost 3,074, far more than any other division
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
eeded by the following orders for the march of July 1, to be executed immediately upon their receiptrps commanders early on the following morning, July 1. There was, however, delay in expediting it, ise than he always was. Early in the day of July 1 the commanding general sent to Sedgwick, commar Reynolds could come up. About 8 A. M., of July 1, Buford's advanced pickets gave warning that tas as follows: To General Meade: Gettysburg, July 1, 10.10 A. M. The enemy's force (A. P. Hill'front. See map No. 10, position 2.30 P. M., July 1. At 4.30 P. M., General Meade sent a despawritten despatch by his aide, Captain Parker: July 1, 5.25. General: When I arrived here an handing general: Headquarters Eleventh Corps, July 1, 5 P. M. First. Gen. Reynolds attacked the ts of the first day's contest. Before dark of July 1 he had fully two-thirds of his army present onhad been at Abbottstown on the night of the 1st of July, was moving back from that place to join th[9 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 17 (search)
First and Eleventh Corps were in great danger, Besides numerous reports, the following brief communication reached me, which accidentally fell into my hands:— July 1, Gettysburg, General Sickles:-- General Doubleday, (First corps) says for God's sake come up with all speed, they are pressing us hard. H. T., Lee, A. D. C. decisive contest that must occur on the following day. It appears that General Meade had issued a circular (of which I saw several copies) on the morning of Wednesday, July 1, to all his commanders, stating that his advance had accomplished all the objects contemplated—namely, the relief of Harrisburg and Philadelphia—and that he gaged. It is strange that General Meade should make no mention in his report of this singular and most important fact: That he issued a plan of campaign on Wednesday, July 1, directing his whole army to retire and take up the defensive on Pipe Creek almost at the moment that his left flank was fiercely struggling with the right w<
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 30 (search)
0th of June, possibly on the morning of the 1st of July, certainly before any positive information ict with any portion of my force. On the 1st of July, my headquarters being at Taneytown, and hathan at Gettysburg. Early in the evening of July 1, I should suppose about 6 or 7 o'clock, I recem the account given to me of the operations of July 1, that the enemy were concentrating there. Thers issued by me on the 30th of June and the 1st of July, a careful perusal of which, I am sure, wiler, until pretty late on the morning of the 1st of July. Letter D contains the orders for the movement of troops on July 1, under which two corps were moved up to Gettysburg. Letter E is the circul, issued to corps commanders on the morning of July 1, before the information from General Buford haould be enforced. About 1 o'clock on the 1st of July I received the sad intelligence of the falld remained at Taneytown on the night of the 1st of July, and did not join me on the field until abo[2 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), Appendix Y (search)
undwork for this report that I had directed an order to retreat. On the evening of the 2d of July, after the battle of that day had ceased, and darkness had set in, being aware of the very heavy losses of the First and Eleventh Corps on the 1st of July, and knowing how severely the Third Corps, the Fifth Corps, and other portions of the army had suffered in the battle of the 2d of July—in fact, as subsequently ascertained, out of the 24,000 men killed, wounded, and missing, which was the amo took command of it on the 28th of June; that the corps were widely separated, feeling for the enemy, preparatory to concentration; and that battle evidently could not be long postponed, as in point of fact the first day's encounter was on the 1st of July. It is strange that General Doubleday, upon having his suspicions aroused just before the battle of Gettysburg, did not discard the unworthy thought upon which they turned with regard to General Meade, if not from the point of view of being u