hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,040 1,040 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 90 90 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 56 56 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 55 55 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 40 40 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 39 39 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 31 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 26 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for July 1st or search for July 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

t, fell severely wounded. Major Ashton, of the same regiment, had seized the colors of the regiment after three brave men had been shot down in the act of bearing them forward, and was bravely cheering on his men, when, pierced by several balls, he fell and died instantly. The Seven Days afforded a superb exhibition of the highest qualities of the fighting American. During that week of colossal conflicts, beginning with Mechanicsville bridge on June 27th and ending with Malvern Hill on July 1st, Americans on both sides were fighting all day; sleeping on their arms at night when they could, up before dawn to renew the fight, and passing, day after day, through the terrible round of battle, which like Don Worm in the bud, grows by what it feeds upon. Neither army, we are free to say now, had cause for shame in the details of heroism when written out by un-partisan pens. With this admission it may be added that in their marked discrepancy of numbers, the Confeder- ates had more rea
g, an exceedingly elastic phrase. Under a fighter like Longstreet, it might mean many chances on the fighting line. Under a Fabius, it might easily suffer from an overdose of inaction. The Washington artillery was directed to move out on the Mechanicsville turnpike. Once on the pike, the battalion began to learn what the phrase reserve artillery might mean. They saw no fighting on the 26th; grumbled at the reserve on the 27th; frowned on the 28th, 29th and 30th —were lured into hope on July 1st, and dropped into gloom by Longstreet himself late on the afternoon of Malvern Hill. Longstreet had said: We have done all we can to-day. Park your guns in the field alongside the road. Owen's In Camp and Battle with the Washington Artillery. That was all That same night McClellan sought repose at Harrison's landing—leaving the batteries still in reserve. On July 5th-7th Squires' battery, with Col. S. D. Lee, had some practice on the Union shipping on the James. Impatient at their
the Guard, with his Parrott guns, joined Hampton's cavalry on the evening of the 2d just in time to engage the enemy. At their position they could see the enemy's wagon-trains rolling away. The Guard could do nothing toward their capture, for the business in hand was of a more war-like nature. On the 3d they gave effective aid to Stuart and Hampton in the cavalry battle on the right flank. The Guard lost 7 killed and wounded. Maurin's Donaldsonville boys were just in time at Gettysburg, July 1st, to relieve one of Pegram's batteries whose ammunition had been expended on the foe. To keep worthily in a heady fight the place of a Pegram battery, was not easy; doubtless Pegram's eyes, young but keen, looking approvingly on the work and on the men doing it. Moody's Madison boys, with Alexander, shared the work of Colonel Walton's men shelling the Peach orchard on the 2d and the memorable artillery duel of the 3d. They were warmly commended by Colonel Alexander. Only as Confederates