hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,040 1,040 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 90 90 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 56 56 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 55 55 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 40 40 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 39 39 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 31 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 26 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for July 1st or search for July 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
d my hat, when one spoke to me very kindly, told me their minister was an Alabamian, from Florence, Ala. Went alone to National Hotel for dinner, registered in midst of an unfriendly and scowling crowd of rough looking men. Had a poor dinner, rather ungraciously served by a Dutchy looking young waitress. June 29. Crossed Blue Ridge Mountains at a gap at Papertown. Marched on turnpike to Petersburg, and took the Frederick City road, bivouacking at Hiedlersburg. Battle of Gettysburg. July 1. Marched through Middletown towards Gettysburg. This proved one of the most eventful days of my life. We could hear and see the shelling in front of Gettysburg, and were soon in range. Rodes' Division was actively engaged in a very short time. His old Alabama brigade, under Col. E. A. O'Neal, was shelled fiercely. Capt. Jas. T. Davis, of Co. D, was killed near me, and his brains scattered upon me. He was a brave, good man. Another shell exploded in my company and wounded Corporal J. H
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Battle and campaign of Gettysburg. (search)
advance was in Gettysburg, we should march to that place and notify General Lee accordingly; nothing was decided that night. About seven or eight next morning, July 1st, begun the march towards Middletown, as I suggested that place to be indirectly on the way to both Cashtown and Gettysburg, and that a courier should be sent to ad hardly suffered at all and General Johnson had not been in the fight, only reaching the field by sundown. What were the enemy's condition and movements? July 1st. At 3 P. M. the 1st and 11th Corps had been dispersed, except Steinwehr's Division of 3 or 4000 men, a reserve left on Cemetery Hill. General Hancock reached C direction of affairs at this juncture. I have since been told by one of General Lee's staff, that an order was handed to General Ewell in the afternoon of the 1st July to pursue our success, and advance if he was in a condition to do so. July 2nd. This morning all was quiet. General Lee, about 9 A. M., rode over to General